YA

Category: YA

All of us writers have voices in our heads.  I’m fairly sure of this.  In my novel, Thin Places, Declan is used to having the traditional imaginary male friends that have stayed with him since childhood. But now he is hearing the voice of a girl, an Irish girl. And he is certain it is not coming from his imagination.

Rebecca is real. Soon he not only hears her but he sees her as well — even though no one else can. His life is going nowhere at home and he knows he must solve this riddle of this girl in his head. He must go to Ireland and find her.

The Gift of Reading

Posted on February 21 by Kristine Scarrow in Teens

As the author of young adult novels that tackle gritty and difficult subject matter, I am often asked why I write what I do. What I think fuels my desire to write about these topics more than anything is the idea that life can be challenging, and reading about real issues is important. We need to know that we are not alone in our struggles, and that no matter how dire things may seem, there will be brighter days ahead.  I hope that when the characters in my novels dream beyond their current circumstance, it inspires the reader to do the same.

The Passing of Patricia Bow

Posted on January 13 by Kyle

This has been a very sad week indeed. So soon after losing one author, we are saddened to announce that author Patricia Bow passed away on January 7, 2017.

A writer of on science, and history for the University of Waterloo by day, her passion for fiction came out in children's fantasy and wrote such titles as The Bone Flute, which was nominated for a Silver Birch Award in 2006. She was also the author of a 2-book young adult fantasy series called Passage to Mythrin. 

When people ask me how I came to write a novel — And Then the Sky Exploded — about the bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945, and the devastation that followed,  I have to be honest and admit I’m not really sure.

Back to School

Posted on September 5 by Robert Priest

My birthday is in July so going back to school was one way I kind of felt in sync with the outer world. Beginning each new grade I had a new age, a new season, new clothes   (or at least different hand-me-downs) and a new shot at something. Summer holidays were long enough that, come late August I was usually, if only secretly, beginning to make the equivalent of New Year's resolutions to myself about how studious and on time I would be. Not that I was a bad student.

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