women

Category: women

A group of women wrapped in furs and warm winter cloaks stands on the quay at Boulogne. Around them surges a blue, red, and khaki sea of French, British, and Belgian soldiers. White-veiled nurses run alongside patients being carried on stretchers onto waiting ships. There are shouts, marching orders, and whistles as the women stand silently watching, absorbing the details of what they are seeing, overcome by the reality that they are on the doorstep of the Great War.

They are the first party of female Canadian journalists allowed into France to visit the lines of communication.

Women's History Month is a time to recognize and celebrate the contributions of women around the world.

Merna Forster is the author of 100 Canadian Heroines and 100 More Canadian Heroines, the source for all the trivia about to follow. Test what you know of the almost encyclopedic knowledge of Canada's HERstory found in these two books!

October 20, 2016 ― The woman who led the successful national campaign to have women depicted on Canadian money has been awarded the 2016 Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media (Pierre Berton Award). Merna Forster’s campaign resulted in a petition of more than 73,000 names and a commitment from the prime minister to feature a woman from Canadian history on bank notes in 2018.

When Canada declared war on Germany in September, 1939, women from across the nation went to war on the home front. They stepped up, doffing their aprons and donning factory uniforms to bridge the gap with a sombre commitment to do whatever was required to bring their men home. Battles on the frontlines raged while women in Canada braved hardship, managed food rations, raised their families, and often worked in highly dangerous conditions.

Elizabeth Muir’s recent book Canadian Women in the Sky: 100 Years of Flight, shines a light on the often little-known contributions of Canadian women in aviation. Danielle Metcalfe-Chenail delves into Muir’s reasons for writing the book, and the surprising things she learned.

In North America today, women are the fastest growing segment of entrepreneurs and they create jobs at a significantly higher rate than large corporations. I suspect this trend will continue as more women seek flexibility in their employment, diversity in their sources of income and opportunities to make more money; ultimately bucking the trend in the persistent income gap between men and women.

If you’re looking to start or expand your small businesses, you have far greater, and more flexible, options to raise money today than even a decade ago.