Toronto

Category: Toronto

“The Old Neighbourhood” – we’ve all got one, don’t we? Someplace that we remember fondly, even though we might be looking at it through rose-coloured nostalgia glasses. I only lived at Queen and Spadina for five years, but man, those five years were intense. This is the neighbourhood where Jack Palace, fictional protagonist of my new crime thriller Yard Dog, hangs his head.

2017 was a watershed for Canadian housing as some suburban Toronto markets experienced markedly lower prices for the first time in more than a decade. Regulators tightened the rules for mortgage and housing finance. Experts say these changes mean that home buyers will have as much as 20 percent less borrowing power starting early in 2018.

Mortgage fraud-related troubles at alternative lender Home Capital of Toronto and the court-ordered receivership of one of Alberta’s oldest and largest home builders could be harbingers of the beginning of the end of the Canadian housing bubble.

As I’ve done interviews over the past month, one of the most frequently asked questions is: what prompted you to write this book? For me, music is the elixir of life. Without it, I don’t know what I would do. My iPod with more than 83,000 songs is my constant companion. It’s there when I am high and when I’m low. Nothing beats up a sombre mood better than music. By the same token, there’s no greater feeling than cranking up the stereo and singing along to one of my favourite songs.

Born in a manse in Molesworth, Ontario, in 1884, John Paris Bickell would overcome family tragedy to become one of Canada’s true renaissance men of the first half of the twentieth century. JPB or ‘Smiling Jack’, as he was known to many – was fatherless at seven, owned his own brokerage firm at twenty-three and was a millionaire before he turned thirty. As one of the most important industrialists in Canadian history, J.P. Bickell cut an enormous swath across a nation that he helped to shape.

Capital punishment, or the execution of someone found guilty of a crime, dates back to the arrival of European explorers on Canadian shores. Historically, punishment for serious crimes included hanging, death by firing squad, and burning at the stake. But by the time the Dominion of Canada was established in 1867, one method was available for the capital crimes of murder, rape, and treason:  hanging.

Explores the history of Toronto through the final moments of the famous (and infamous) who made it their final resting place. From ancient First Nations burial mounds to the murder of Toronto’s first lightkeeper; from the rise and fall of the city’s greatest Victorian baseball star to the final days of the world’s most notorious anarchist.

Get a small visual glimpse into Adam Bunch's Toronto Book of the Dead with this neat infographic (right-click and save to see a bigger version)!

DON BRAID: After more than a year's work, the big majority of it by co-author Sydney Sharpe, our book Notley Nation is coming to the bookstores.

SYDNEY SHARPE: Don Braid and I have written three books together. A marriage can only handle one book per decade. (I leave the math to you.) The other five I somehow managed on my own.

RIELLE BRAID: After quite some time of watching my badass mother and father (Don Braid and Sydney Sharpe) work their butts off, their new book is finally out and ready to be read by you!

The War of 1812 was barely over when the people of York Mills felled the trees that would become the first St. John’s Anglican Church. Built in 1816 on land that had been donated by pioneer settlers Joseph and Catherine Shepard, the little log church was the first outpost of St. James church in the Town of York and the first parish church in what would one day become the City of Toronto.

Ever since visiting and illustrating Toronto’s 100 libraries, my love of public libraries has grown even more. 

As a traveller, a public library is the best place to go!

Now, when I’m travelling outside Toronto to cities near and far, I take time to visit their local libraries. 

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