Steve Burrows

Category: Steve Burrows

The Magic of a Backstory

Posted on September 11 by Steve Burrows in Mystery

The spotlight shines on the magician’s stage. In the box lies a lady, her torso sliced in two by a shiny, razor-sharp blade. In the audience, breathing stops. Beads of sweat trickle down temples, palm are damp. Can she have survived her ordeal? Is she still alive? Suddenly, the magician speaks: “Ladies and gentlemen, I’m afraid you’ll just have to wait a while before you find out what happened.”

For some time now, I’ve been learning to juggle. I’ve pretty much mastered the principle of throwing objects up in the air at different times; it’s just catching them on the way down I’m still having trouble with. Regardless of how high I throw things, they always seem to come back to me at the same time. The same is true of writing a series. I have written one Birder Murder Mystery per year for the last four years and sent them out into the public arena. This is the equivalent of throwing them in the air.

By now, many of you will have seen this article in USA Today, stating that “creepiness” is linked to clowns, men, and birdwatching. I have to say, I agree whole-heartedly. There are few creepier things than stalking through a quiet forest early in the morning only to be confronted by a man in a polka-dotted jumpsuit and a red nose, carrying a pair of high-end Swarovskis.

Steve Burrows Win Arthur Ellis Award!

Posted on May 29 by Kyle in Awards

Dundurn is excited to announce that Steve Burrows's heralded debut, A Siege of Bitterns, has added Arthur Ellis Award winner to its already impressive list of accolades. The novel was awarded the prize for Best First Novel in a ceremony Thursday evening at Toronto's iconic Arts & Letters Club. Burrows, who is on tour currently in the Northwest Territories, was unable to pick up the award in person, but was thrilled by the news.

The Perfect Crime

Posted on April 26 by Steve Burrows

The perfect crime is possible. In fact, my next book opens with one. But you can’t sustain a mystery novel with just a perfect crime for very long. A perfect crime, by definition, is one that leaves no clues, and clues, as we all know, are the lifeblood of mysteries. If the contest between writer and reader is going to be a meaningful one, then the clues need to be sufficient, and sufficiently cryptic, to give a quick-witted reader a sporting chance of solving the mystery.