music

Category: music

Circumstances surrounding any writing about Glenn Gould these days can best be explained if I point to what happened one Saturday afternoon years back in St. Peter's Anglican Church in Erindale, the ever-morphing suburb where I grew up. For a pre-Christmas event for children to help explain the meaning of the season, a parishioner known to play a little piano was asked to provide accompaniment on few hymns.

Michael Hill is the author of The Mariposa Folk Festival, and the festival's unofficial historian too. Both the festival and Dundurn had some questions for Michael about writing the book and his interest in folk music's legendary roots.

Here are a few questions we asked him, and a video Q&A he did with the festival below.

The ultimate giveaway came when Robert B. Parker began running an author’s photo on his book jackets showing him in poses with his dog. For years, and over the course of a dozen or more novels in Parker’s compelling series featuring the Boston private eye Spenser, I had figured that Parker, in shaping Spenser’s personality and back story, had borrowed elements from his own life and grafted them on to his fictional guy Spenser. Parker had fought in the Korean War; so did Spenser.

Selected Essentials: An Austin Clarke Playlist

Posted on February 23 by Kyle in News
Novelist, poet, teacher, and Giller Prize-winner Austin Clarke was a young man during golden age of jazz and a witness to some live performances that today’s music aficionado can only dream of. But we can offer you the next best thing: a select playlist of some of Austin Clarke’s favourite songs (or, in one case, an entire album).

When I was in the preteen phase of my life-long addiction to rock n' roll, my Dad came home from work one weekend with a massive Bell and Howell reel to reel tape recorder. It was love! I held the taxi dispatcher microphone up to the speaker of our home stereo/credenza and recorded songs off the radio creating my first mixtapes.

Today's blog post is from Allister Thompson, editor of Christopher Ward's new book Dead Brilliant.

 

Author Christopher Ward, as one of the original VJs on MuchMusic in the eighties, was part of the youth of a very large part of Canada’s population. In fact, and I’m not buttering him up here, he was my favourite. He hosted the Fromage show that collected the most heinous videos of the year and seemed to have a pretty cynical, measured take on the whole pop culture thing. As a noted cynic myself, I found his attitude refreshing.

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