death

Category: death

Capital punishment, or the execution of someone found guilty of a crime, dates back to the arrival of European explorers on Canadian shores. Historically, punishment for serious crimes included hanging, death by firing squad, and burning at the stake. But by the time the Dominion of Canada was established in 1867, one method was available for the capital crimes of murder, rape, and treason:  hanging.

Tony Westell 1926 - 2017

Posted on April 11 by Kyle in News

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Tony Westell.

A lifelong newsman and journalist, Anthony Westell joined the Globe and Mail in 1956, becoming a member of the editorial board, and then Ottawa Bureau Chief. He joined the Toronto Star as the national affairs columnist in 1969 and later moved to Carleton University&;s prestigious Journalism school to teach his profession. Eventually, he moved on to become director of the School of Journalism and Associate Dean of Arts.

Helen Mclean 1928 - 2017

Posted on February 10 by Kyle in News

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Toronto writer and artist Helen Mclean.

A talented artist, she exhibited her paintings across Canada, she has shown in several cities and has painted portraits of authors Margaret Laurence, Michael Ondaatje, and Sarah Sheard. 

She also worked as a teacher and a journalist.

She was the author of Sketching from Memory (Oberon Press), Of All the Summers (Women's Press), and the acclaimed memoir Details From a Larger Canvas (Dundurn Press).

Alexis S. Troubetzkoy 1934 - 2017

Posted on February 8 by Kyle in News

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Alexis S. Troubetzkoy.

Troubetzkoy, born the scion of a Russian princely family, was an internationally published writer and archivist. Many of us at Dundurn had the privilege to work with him on his two most recent books, Arctic Obsession: The Lure of the Far North and The St. Petersbrug Connection. 

Although born in France and raised partly in the United States, Troubetzkoy called Canada home for more than 30 years with a career in education as a headmaster of private schools in Montreal and Toronto.

Our bodies are ours to control, free from state interference – or so it appears. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms provides: “Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.”

“Over the course of a century… facts, errors, and myths regarding Thomson’s life and death have become jumbled into provocative, entertaining, but ultimately untrustworthy stories.”

                Introduction, The Many Deaths of Tom Thomson

 

The renowned Canadian landscape painter Tom Thomson likely died on July 8, 1917. We don’t know for sure.

Just like we don’t exactly know how he died.

I accidentally wrote a book. Not the kind of accident where you break a favourite lead-crystal glass by dropping it on granite tile, or brain a fellow golfer by slicing your tee shot onto an adjoining fairway. More like that accident where you set off looking for a western route to the Indies and discover a whole new continent. Or you design an adhesive to stick porcelain tile to a metallic spaceship and end up with a Post-It note.

 

Stonechild and Rouleau are back for round 3, tell us about Tumbled Graves.

The book opens with the disappearance of a woman and her three year old daughter, an investigation that begins in Kingston, Ontario, but expands to Gananoque, Ottawa and a biker bar in Montreal. In addition, major developments take place in the lives of the main cops: Officer Kala Stonechild becomes guardian for her cousin’s teenage daughter while Staff Sergeant Jacques Rouleau must face the impending death of his ex-wife.