The Real Allure is Nature Itself

The Real Allure is Nature Itself

Posted on May 13 by Darryl Blazino
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Peering out my window I gaze longingly over an endless expanse of ice blanketing Lake Superior, a virtual freshwater ocean.  A steady flurry of wet snow pelts against the window melting instantly. It halts briefly before dripping down the pane blurring the grey and unwelcoming vista. Despite my best efforts I must admit that my disposition matches the sullen landscape as an especially harsh and brutal winter in Northern Ontario shows few signs of relenting well into this month of April.

 Come morning, a glorious sunrise will cause the fracturing ice crystals to sparkle like a million diamonds, the islands that dot the harbour will glow once again, and thoughts of paddling a distant shoreline or hiking through an old growth forest will become so vivid in my mind that I can smell the fragrant pines and hear the lapping of the waves on the rocky shore.

While winter provides numerous opportunities to enjoy the beauty of nature, it is unquestionably during the summer when the vast majority of Canadians reconnect with Mother Earth.  When asked to reflect on one’s favourite childhood memories, “summers by the lake” tends to be a frequent reply.  It would be drastically superficial to conclude that the appeal of summer camping is in the activities (swimming, boating or sunbathing) nor is it merely in leaving the stress of the working world behind.  The real allure is nature itself.

Reconnecting with nature, whether it be in the forests, mountains or lakes and streams, is undoubtedly the best way to recharge the human spirit and feel truly alive. There is something primordial in all of us that flourishes when unencumbered by the trappings of mankind and immersed in the wonders of nature. There are very few remedies in life more therapeutic than a walk in the woods, listening to the haunting call of a loon echoing over the lake or gazing into the glowing embers of a campfire under the starlight. It is in these moments, in this landscape where the world simply makes sense. We understand our place within it, understand how tiny and fragile we are, yet feel empowered and in control of our lives and our destiny.  It is where our eyes, ears and hearts seem to open widest and we truly feel alive again.

While even the most significant event s of my city life tend to pass in a blur I seem to notice even the most minute and intricate details of the nature. I have a heightened awareness of every sound, every smell and the tiniest details of nature’s tiniest marvels. I can close my eyes and I am there again. And the feeling returns…the inner peace, the happiness and hope and excitement of once again returning to the endless places that beckon me.

Darryl Blazino

Posted by Kendra on December 6, 2014
Darryl Blazino photo

Darryl Blazino

Darryl Blazino has explored, camped, and fished on hundreds of lakes over the past two decades and spends nearly 50 days a year pursuing his love of the out-of-doors. His articles and photographs have been regularly published in The Boundary Waters Journal. He lives in Thunder Bay, Ontario.