Literary Clarity with Barbara Fradkin

Barbara Fradkin

Literary Clarity with Barbara Fradkin

Posted on January 27 by Kyle in Interview, Mystery
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Tell us about your book.

NONE SO BLIND examines justice itself, not in the abstract, but with all the flaws, biases, doubts, and best efforts of those who strive to carry it out. When a convicted college professor is found dead weeks after being released on parole, Ottawa Police Inspector Michael Green is forced to re-examine the case upon which his career and reputation were built.

 

How did you come up with the idea for this work?

This is the tenth novel in the series, and I wanted to mark the milestone by going back to what started it all and giving Green his greatest challenge yet. He has always seen himself as on the side of right, as a relentless and unwavering voice for victims. The case in NONE SO BLIND challenges his very belief in himself as a champion for justice.

 

How did you research your book?

The internet and books provides crucial facts and background, but for the sights, sounds, and texture of real life, nothing beats live sources. I drove to Belleville and Peterborough, I poked around the streets of Navan and the back roads of Morris Island, and I talked to the people involved. The novel really came to life after I had a lunch conversation with a community chaplain who had worked in the prison system for years. Most people are happy to share their insights, but sadly I have noticed an increasing trend among public officials to be guarded and “correct” in their responses, perhaps reflecting the siege mentality of today’s public service.

 

In your own work, which character are you most attached to and why?

Green himself is my favourite character. I have spent every day of the past fifteen years with the man, more than with my own family, so it’s a good thing I like him! He’s exasperating and prickly at times, but at heart he’s striving to be a good man. I wouldn’t want to be married to him, but he’s intelligent, complex, and endearing. Most importantly, he’s never dull to be around.

 

What's the best advice you've ever received as a writer?

Money and fame are elusive, so write for the love of it, and write what you love. If you are passionate about your writing, your writing will sparkle and your stories will come alive.