We Remember Battle Stories

We Remember Battle Stories

Posted on November 3 by Kyle
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In honour of Remembrance Day, we’re reading up on the men and women who have served in some of the most iconic battles that echo through world history to the present day.

The Battle Stories series was written by renowned experts and complete with quotes, photographs and detailed maps, each Battle Story offers readers clear insight into the unfolding action. 

Don&;t Forget: Between October 11 - Nov 11, 2016, you can use promo code REMEMBER for 25% off select Battle Stories books!

 

Hastings 1066

In 1066, a foreign invader won the throne of England in a single battle and changed not only the history of the British Isles but of Christendom forever. Harold Godwinson’s army, exhausted from their victory against an invading Norwegian Viking army at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in the north, and his navy, scattered by storms, could not hold back William of Normandy. But would the invasion have succeeded if the two armies had met on equal terms?
 

Bosworth, 1485

Bosworth Field saw the two great dynasties of the day clash on the battlefield: the reigning House of York, led by Richard III, against the rising House of Tudor, led by Henry Tudor, soon to become Henry VII.

On August 22, 1485, this penultimate battle in the War of the Roses was fought with the might of the Yorkists ranged against Henry Tudor’s small army. This book describes how these two great armies came to meet on the battlefield and how the tactics employed by Tudor and his captains eventually led to the defeat and the death of King Richard III.

 

 

Waterloo 1815

The might of the French Empire under the leadership of the Emperor Napoleon faced the Coalition army under Duke of Wellington and Gerhard von Blucher for one last time at Waterloo. The battle saw the culmination of a long campaign to destroy Napoleon’s forces and halt the growth of the French Empire. Both sides fought bitterly, and Wellington later remarked that “it was the nearest-run thing you ever saw in your life.” Both armies lost over 20,000 men on the battlefield that day, but it was the coalition that emerged victorious in the end. 

Wellington’s army counter-attacked and threw the French troops into disarray as the fled from the field. The coalition forces entered France and restored Louis XVIII to the throne. Napoleon was exiled to the island of Saint Helena, where he later died.

Waterloo was a resounding victory for the British Army and changed the course of European history. This Battle Story tells you everything you need to know about this critical battle.

Isandlwana 1879

On January 22, 1879, a 20,000-strong Zulu army attacked 1,700 British and colonial forces. The engagement saw primitive weapons of spears and shields clashing with the latest military technology. However, despite being poorly equipped, the numerically superior Zulu force crushed the British troops, killing 1,300 men, while only losing 1,000 of their own warriors. It was a humiliating defeat for the British Army, which had been poorly trained and which had underestimated its enemy.

The defeat ensured that the British had a renewed respect for their opponents and changed their tactics; rather than fighting in a straight, linear formation, known as the Thin Red Line, they adopted an entrenched system or close order formations.

The defeat caused much consternation throughout the British Empire, which had assumed that the Zulu were no match for the British Army; thus, the army was greatly reinforced and went on to victory at Rorke’s Drift. 

Somme 1916  (25% off with REMEMBER promo code)

The Battle of the Somme raged from July 1 to November 18, 1916, and was one of the bloodiest fought in military history. It has come to signify for many the waste and bloodshed of the First World War, as hundreds of thousands of men on all sides lost their lives fighting over small gains in land. Yet this battle was also to mark a turning point in the war and to witness new methods of warfare, such as all-arms integrated attacks, with infantry units and the new Tank Corps fighting alongside each other.

Passchendaele 1917  (25% off with REMEMBER promo code)

Passchendaele is perhaps one of the most iconic campaigns of the First World War, coming to symbolize the mud and blood of the battlefield like no other. Fought for over three months under some of the worst conditions of the war, fighting became bogged down in a quagmire that made it almost impossible for any gains to be made.
 

El Alamein 1942  (25% off with REMEMBER promo code)

The Second Battle of El Alamein marked a major turning point in the Western Desert Campaign of the Second World War.

El Alamein saw two of the greatest generals of the war pitted against each other: Rommel and Montgomery. Through key profiles and a chapter devoted to “The Armies,” El Alamein 1942 explores what made these men inspired leaders and what led to their respective defeat and victory.

Montgomery’s success ensured that the Axis army was unable to occupy Egypt and therefore gain control of the Suez Canal or the Middle Eastern oil fields, thereby preventing a major source of income and power coming to them. 

Arnhem 1944  (25% off with REMEMBER promo code)

When we think of Arnhem, we think of a bridge too far and a sky full of parachutes dropping the Allies into the Netherlands. It was one of the most complex and strategically important operations of WWII.

 

 

Iwo Jima 1945 (25% off with REMEMBER promo code)

Operation Detachment, the invasion of Iwo Jima, on February 19, 1945, was the first campaign on Japanese soil, and it resulted in some of the fiercest fighting of the Pacific campaign. United States Marines supported by the U.S. Navy and Air Force fought the Japanese both over and underground on the island of volcanic ash, in a battle which was immortalized by the raising of the Stars and Stripes above Mount Suribachi. It was a battle that the Japanese could not win, but were determined to die trying; of the 18,000-strong garrison, only 200 were taken prisoner. The Americans lost more in the 35-day battle, but at the end they had possession of three airfields in range of the Japanese mainland.

Goose Green 1982

The Battle for Goose Green has become an integral part of the Falklands story, and yet it nearly didn’t take place at all. Originally earmarked to be isolated, Goose Green was eventually attacked due to the loss of momentum in the invasion force.

The British 2 Para Regiment were deployed against the 12th Argentinean Regiment, which numbered about 1,200 men. The British believed that the Argentinean force numbered at least half this and set off with a strength of 690 men. They took two days’ rations, weapons, and ammunition in the belief that it would be a swift conquest.

There followed a bitter and bloody fight as the Argentine forces fiercely defended Goose Green. Despite reconnaissance, the British were hampered by trench systems that they had been unaware of. Eventually the Argentines were forced to surrender, with 961 men captured, 145 taken prisoner during the fighting, and 47 killed. It was the first major engagement of the Falklands War.