Wasted Time...

Wasted Time Blog

Wasted Time...

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I began writing this work upon nearing eleven full years in Federal custody. A good friend, who was also a lawyer from my past, perplexed by my continued incarceration, volunteered to represent me pro bono at a future parole hearing. It had been suggested many times by a few lawyers (including this one) that I write a biography, and since I was currently without finances to reward this offer, I secretly set about putting pen to paper.

 

Over my many years of custody, I read enough books to fill a library. As a result, my vocabulary increased, and I was able to find proper words as my mind required them. Still, I found it very difficult to write among the daily routine of prison life, the distractions and required work assignments, but I pressed on, sometimes at night, alone in a cell or during the day when I could find a computer available (no internet) and type away on a disc setting. Most times it was difficult for me to reach the level of thought needed to write a book, and even when I could reach that level, it was difficult to maintain long enough to accomplish any substantial progress. Throughout the course of writing, I found that the few distractions influenced my present mindset. I found myself thinking about the commonalities expressed by the people I had met serving time and the routine of watching the nightly news for the highlights, most of which were violent, criminal occurrences in my hometown. I found myself writing with a new form of redemption in mind for my own indiscretions. When I finished writing, I allowed two prisoners whose intellect I respected most to read my work. With their approval, I had the disc transcribed onto paper, which I presented to my lawyer. Since coming out, Wasted Time has taken on its own life.

 

 

Edward Hertrich

Posted by Kendra on March 27, 2018
Edward Hertrich photo

Edward Hertrich

Edward Hertrich spent decades in prison for crimes committed in his youth. Having served his sentences and completed five years on parole, he now strives to spread a clearer understanding of life and redemption. Edward lives in Toronto, Ontario.