Bruce Murray on Writing a Novel from Rich Acadian Tradition

Bruce Murray on Writing a Novel from Rich Acadian Tradition

Posted on August 15 by Bruce Murray in Fiction
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Evangeline, Pelagie, and La Sagouine are all Acadian symbols — fictional characters who represent the history and culture of the Acadian people. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Antonine Maillet wrote about Acadian characters, inspired by the true story of the Acadian people of eastern Canada. This rich literary tradition of telling the Acadian story has not often included actual historical characters. Until now!

My ancestor Pierre Belliveau (known as Piau), along with his brother Charles and Joseph Broussard (known as Beausoleil), was a freedom fighter during the Expulsion of the Acadians in 1755-1756. Their stories survived through oral tradition for over two hundred years — and have finally been resurrected in my upcoming novel,  Piau: Journey to the Promised Land.

The novel is a poignant story with many fictional elements but the story of the heroism of these three remarkable men is true to the last detail. It’s a story of joy, laughter, suffering and human courage in their quest for freedom.

It is a tale of ethnic cleansing perpetrated by the British in Nova Scotia not unlike what is occurring in these times.

Love, laughter, and tears unite to tell a story never before found in the pages of fiction. 

Bruce Murray

Posted by Dundurn Guest on November 1, 2016
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Bruce Murray

Bruce Murray is a former singer-songwriter who recorded with CBS and Capitol Records. He has degrees from St. Francis Xavier University, the University of Toronto, and an M.A. in history from the University of Victoria. Bruce lives in Toronto.