“Art is a wound turned to light.” ─anon

“Art is a wound turned to light.” ─anon

Posted on May 9 by Karen Hood-Caddy
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It started when I saw two men fire up chain saws and begin dismembering an old tree on my street. Huge, gnarled and majestic, the tree was one of my favourites. Heartsick, I watched the men. Should I try and stop them? Would they listen or would I just end up getting myself arrested?  As a single parent, I didn’t have the option of going to jail.

My response was to write about it.

Thus, my first novel, Tree Fever, was born. Other novels with environmental themes followed. I was captivated with characters who did courageous environmental acts and researched stories for inspiration. I read about Julia Hill who lived in a giant redwood for over two years to save a forest. I read about Zander Srodes who gave “Turtle Talks” all over the world as he tried to save the Loggerhead Sea Turtle. I read about Paul Watson, the man who sank illegal vessels to save whales.

The stories of kids doing heroic acts particularly fascinated me, so I changed genres and began writing what I call eco-fiction for children. Both Howl, the first book in the series (nominated for two awards) and The Truth About Brave both involve kids saving some aspect of the environment ─ they rescue hurt bears, they expose chicken factory farms, they crawl out on thin ice to save a dog. They do these acts even though they are afraid and unskilled.

I’ve decided to help real kids do this too, so I’m developing a program called ‘Earth Heroes’ that catalyzes kids to dream up and implement their own environmental projects and become ‘Earth Heroes’ themselves. If you know of a school that might be interested, please let me know. Thanks. karen[at]personalbest[dot]org

Karen Hood-Caddy

Posted by Kendra on October 30, 2014
Karen Hood-Caddy photo

Karen Hood-Caddy

Karen Hood-Caddy is an avid nature lover and the author of seven novels. Her first novel in The Wild Place Adventure Series, Howl, was nominated for the Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children Award. She lives on Georgian Bay in Ontario.