Teens

Category: Teens

Dundurn Behind the Covers

Posted on September 22 by Kyle in Non-fiction, Teens

Three of the most recent covers to come out of the Dundurn design department are Sadia, The 4 Year Olympian, and The Teen's Guide to Debating and Public Speaking. These books all feature illustrated covers but are aimed at vastly different audiences. Here are the upcoming books and what our designers had to say.

All of us writers have voices in our heads.  I’m fairly sure of this.  In my novel, Thin Places, Declan is used to having the traditional imaginary male friends that have stayed with him since childhood. But now he is hearing the voice of a girl, an Irish girl. And he is certain it is not coming from his imagination.

Rebecca is real. Soon he not only hears her but he sees her as well — even though no one else can. His life is going nowhere at home and he knows he must solve this riddle of this girl in his head. He must go to Ireland and find her.

Canyoneering involves roped-up, wetsuited adventurers descending waterfalls and sculpted canyons. It’s a sport so heart-stopping and photogenic that when I saw a spread of it in a magazine, I declared, “This is the topic of my next adventure novel!”

Tracker’s Canyon is my seventeenth young-adult adventure novel, and I still get excited when I discover a new so-called “extreme sport.” It gives me a chance to research it in-depth and meet its athletes, maybe even try it out. Why do all my novels involve outdoor adventure and sports?

The Gift of Reading

Posted on February 21 by Kristine Scarrow in Teens

As the author of young adult novels that tackle gritty and difficult subject matter, I am often asked why I write what I do. What I think fuels my desire to write about these topics more than anything is the idea that life can be challenging, and reading about real issues is important. We need to know that we are not alone in our struggles, and that no matter how dire things may seem, there will be brighter days ahead.  I hope that when the characters in my novels dream beyond their current circumstance, it inspires the reader to do the same.

Secrecy Vs. the Truth

Posted on January 12 by Deb Loughead in Teens

As a child I was fascinated by mysteries. This clearly originated in my reading, from Trixie Belden and Nancy Drew, to Enid Blyton’s adventure, and later every single Agatha Christie novel.  When I was ten, I started my own sleuthing club, the Amateur Detective Club. My sister and best friend and I even followed a pickle trail once.

via GIPHY

The concept for Missing Piece, the final book of my Spell Crossed trilogy, wound up radiating through not only the plot and the characters but the form the novel took and the process of writing it.

Two of the main characters, Xemion and Tharfen, have previously had a collision in the frictionless borough of Shissilill. As a result, they have each come away with a piece of the other magically embedded in them. Much of the action of the book tells the tale of how Tharfen goes about trying to recover her missing piece.

When people ask me how I came to write a novel — And Then the Sky Exploded — about the bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945, and the devastation that followed,  I have to be honest and admit I’m not really sure.

When I first had the idea to write Hawk, I knew I would have to go to the Oil Sands and see it with my own eyes. I'd done a lot of online research and had already decided that my protagonist would come from the remote First Nations Community of Fort Chipewyan, down-steam of the oil sands industry where according to Mr. Google there was a lot of sickness, including cancer, thought by some to be related to toxins from the industry.

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