Non-fiction

Category: Non-fiction

Since the Boer War, cyclists had been used on the battlefield as light cavalry responsible for reconnaissance, scouting, screening, and communications. The thinking was that the “act of dismounting deprived a cavalry unit of the services of the men detailed to care for the horses. As one man could only manage four horses or so, the transition from saddle to boot cost a cavalry unit some 25 percent of its rifle strength.

The Irish immigrants who made homes for themselves in mid Canada during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries are the subject of my latest book. They achieved extraordinary success. Feats of physical endurance were commonplace. Their pioneering achievements were phenomenal, but, because so much attention has been given in recent times to the suffering the Irish experienced during the Great Irish Famine of 1847, their story has not been told properly.

 

September 4, 2018―Dundurn Press is thrilled that four outstanding Dundurn titles have been nominated for the Heritage Toronto Award for Historical Writing. Don Mills by Scott Kennedy, The Great Gould by Peter Goddard, The Legendary Horseshoe Tavern by David McPherson, and The Toronto Book of the Dead by Adam Bunch all made the list and are in great company with the other nominated titles.

 

As a youngster I was thrilled by the adventures of Jim Hawkins in Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, but never gave too much attention to the real nature and history of pirates, even as I went on with my education and eventually became a museum director. The sea, however, has always been a fascination for me, and I answered that interest by being commissioned in the Naval Reserve and doing a fair amount of sailing as a crew member on “tall ships” on the Great Lakes, the Caribbean, and even across the Pacific to Hawaii.

I was invited to attend the British Home Child Reunion on July 22, 2018, in Kitchener, Ontario to launch my new book, Marjorie Her War Years: A British Home Child in Canada. The event was organized by Lori Oschefski of the British Home Children Advocacy and Research Association. It was held at the Waterloo Region Museum.

 

Reunion: the act or process of being brought together again as a unified whole.

 

Did you know that our country was originally supposed to be called the Kingdom of Canada? This was the proposal made in 1866 by John A. Macdonald, who was to become the first prime minister at Confederation a year later. But the idea was turned down by the British government because they feared it would offend the Americans — a familiar story! Canada was then and is today a constitutional monarchy, a completely different political system from that of the United States.

An Olympic Rowing Crew: A Balance of Personalities

Once we had earned our seats in the boat, our bowman, Gabe Bergen, gave each of us a spirit animal to represent our appearance and personality. Here’s my take on each of my teammates.

Gabe Bergen - Diviner of Spirit Animals

Gabe was the oldest at age 30. Gabe is his own inimitable entity. On first glance, you’d think his perpetually scruffy beard and gleaming eyes were telling of his wisdom. Well, you’d be right. Gabe knew just what to say, and when to say it, to bring either comedic relief in training or the right perspective in competition.

Accountability Rising

Posted on December 5 by Art Horn in Non-fiction

Over the sound of his straining engine, a pilot really did shout that I should throw my two boxes of personal items out the small side door of his two-seater aircraft. The idea was that we were going to crash because the plane was too heavy and there was nothing but forest beneath us. Even during takeoff he voiced his concern about the weight of my baggage, but once we were airborne there was no longer a question. Perhaps we shouldn’t have taken off in the first place.

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