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#InsideDundurn with Sheila

Posted on July 19 by Kyle in News

Are you ready for a history lesson in Canadian publishing? Today we’re talking to someone who’s been in the business for a very long time, Dundurn’s manager of contracts and administrative services, Kirk Howard’s executive assistant, and our colourful resident fashionista, Sheila Douglas.

“I’ve been working for 44 years,” Sheila says, “And exactly half of that I’ve spent in publishing.”

“You boys have told a good one!” Such was the sentiment that greeted Andrew Traficante and I when we made our way to Newfoundland in support of our recently published book, A Boy from Botwood. With kind assistance from Dundurn’s Michelle Melski, our schedule permitted us to catch up with Frank Gogos, the remarkable, engaging Royal Newfoundland Regiment Museum curator and author, in St. John’s and meet some terrific regional booksellers (such as the Downhome Shoppe, pictured here) who are carrying our work.

There are moments that can be called classic Orillia, and the reasons why I will always love the place.

Its leaders and ordinary citizens have always striven to make their hometown unique, and that’s led to inventions and movements ahead of their time.

But that same spirit has led to some amusing battles and derailed the ordinary achievements that other cities accomplish with less effort.

In the second edition of The Orillia Spirit: An Illustrated History, the classic Orillia moment comes with the battle to build a long-sought recreation centre.

Hello from Crime Writers of Canada

Posted on July 10 by Kyle in News

Thanks to Dundurn for giving Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) this chance to connect, especially this year when Canada will be celebrating its 150th birthday, CWC will celebrate its 35th anniversary, and Bouchercon will be held in Canada too. It sounds as though it’s going to be a very Canadian year! On behalf of our more than 300 members I’d like to let you know you’ll be extremely welcome if you choose to visit us this year – at our website, by reading our work, or in person.

2017 marks not only Canada's 150th year as a country but Dundurn's 45th year as a publisher. In honour of this, we asked our authors to describe how the Canadian identity or history influenced their work. Some went into great detail, some kept it simple. Here's what they said.

I started school in 1956 in a one-room schoolhouse west of Wilton, Ontario, in a tiny community called Thorpe, which encompassed about five or six farms. From that moment on, my teachings about Native Studies encompassed, to my recollection, a few pages on the Iroquois and pictures of teepees and longhouses. To be a Native at that time was definitely not cool. Being designated a Native would have brought beatings, stares, and a path towards poverty because no one would hire you.

Unless you’ve spent the past few weeks living in an internet-free cave in Afghanistan, you are probably aware of the “cultural appropriation prize” fiasco. In short, attempting to explain the expansive creativity of contemporary indigenous writers, Write magazine editor Hal Niedzviecki suggested a learned ability to appropriate. “Buffeted by history and circumstance,” he wrote, indigenous writers must borrow and engage with cultures not their own, and “so often must write from what they don’t know.” As a joke, he suggested a “cultural appropriation prize.”

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