Mystery

Category: Mystery

Halloween Blog Post

I wasn’t expecting ghosts. I took the train to Stratford from Toronto to launch my book, The Man with the Black Valise, and everything was lining up nicely. The next day would be the 125th anniversary of the murder of Jessie Keith, a girl who lived north of Stratford in Listowel. Her killer had stood trial at the Perth County Court House, then been hanged at Stratford Jail, both a few blocks from where I was to speak.

Cullen and Cobb Blog Post

Cullen and Cobb and Me

Posted on October 24 by David A. Poulsen in Mystery

I’m sure the question that mystery writers are most often asked is:  How much like you is your main character? I’m betting Gail Bowen has heard it dozens, maybe hundreds of times about her wonderful Joanne Kilbourne, that Ian Rankin gets it all the time with respect to Rebus, and that Bill Deverell is often asked how similar he is to the brilliantly created Arthur Beauchamp; in fact, it was one of the questions I posed to him during a recent interview.

Flights and Falls Blog

I'm so proud to introduce Flights and Falls, the fourth book in my B.C. Blues crime series.

This one takes place in North Vancouver and out past Horseshoe Bay along the Sea-to-Sky Highway, and the challenge for my team begins with a crash. From the cliffs overlooking the Burrard Inlet, someone with a vile sense of humour is systematically scaring drivers to death, and the game is fishtailing out of control.

March 8, 2019 — Dundurn Press is thrilled to announce that the fifth book in Jeffrey Round’s Dan Sharp Mystery series, The God Game, is a finalist for the 31st Lambda Literary Awards in the Gay Mystery category! Private investigator Dan Sharp finds himself caught up in a political murder when he sets out to find the missing husband of a political aide, and a body turns up on his doorstep. Suddenly, Dan realizes he’s being punished for sticking his nose into dirty politics and must rush to catch the killer and prove his own innocence.

(Photos by: Dave Butler)

 

Should fiction be used for good, or for evil?

That was the question posed to me at a recent festival where I was giving the keynote speech. I had shared my thoughts with the evening’s participants about how the relatively new literary genre known as eco-fiction has influenced conservation, and vice-versa. I offered a list of books that I believe have played that role, including Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam Trilogy, The Road by Cormac McCarthy and even Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, among many others.

If you grew up in Windsor, you probably first learned about Prohibition through stories told to you by your grandparents. These bootleggers and their wild adventures along the Detroit River are a part of local folklore. As a kid, I didn’t really care how much of it was true – I just thought they were great stories. Then along came Marty Gervais’ The Rumrunners, full of photos, newspaper excerpts, and interviews, and that made it real.

Do you believe in ghosts? Yes, I’m talking to you. Well, do you? Do you believe in ghosts?

I’ve always been fascinated by things that go bump in the night. I remember as a child devouring the old Usborne volume on ‘Ghosts’ and being ecstatic when I stumbled upon copies of Fate magazine. My imagination was filled with stories of the restless dead that left my heart fluttering with panic. I didn’t want to imagine what would happen if I actually encountered a spirit that refused to rest in its grave despite being bound with wards and blessing. It was terrifyingly thrilling.

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