Mystery

Category: Mystery

Fabulism

Posted on May 8 by R.M. Greenaway in Fiction, Mystery

In day-to-day life I’m fairly unflappable, but when it comes to writing, I’m a worrier, always finding new things to flap about. Last year it was a concern that there’s an element of the unreal in my BC Blues crime series. I felt that to fit on the shelf labelled “Police Procedural,” a novel has to reflect life to a T, with grit, dirt, cruelty, violence, and all the rest, and should never touch on magic.

May 4, 2018―Dundurn Press is pleased to announce that Full Curl by Dave Butler has been shortlisted for the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize in the mystery category.  This is the fourth annual Emerging Writer Prize. The 2018 shortlist, selected by Kobo’s team of booksellers and booklovers—with book completion rates, customer ratings and reviews considered—comprises six books from each genre. Linwood Barclay will be choosing the winning mystery book and that will be announced on the evening of June 19, 2018.

I wrote the fifth Dan Sharp mystery, The God Game, during the much-publicized political antics of what became known as the Ford Nation. Its self-proclaimed leader, Rob Ford, was then mayor of Toronto. Like many, I was appalled by his aberrant behaviour, but dismissed it as a passing phase in Canadian history. Not for a moment did I think it was just the beginning of what in many ways is now the defining ethos of our current political era.

Uncovering The Roma Plot

Posted on November 9 by Mario Bolduc in Mystery

After sending con artist Max O’Brien to India for his first mission (The Kashmir Trap, 2016), I wanted to use this character in a second book. I did not want to follow with a sequel, but a standalone story that would send Max in a different location. The situation of the Romani people immediately appealed to me. First of all, they originate from India and have travelled across the world for many centuries – which made a nice thematic link to The Kashmir Trap. Secondly, their fate during the Holocaust was not widely known.

The Magic of a Backstory

Posted on September 11 by Steve Burrows in Mystery

The spotlight shines on the magician’s stage. In the box lies a lady, her torso sliced in two by a shiny, razor-sharp blade. In the audience, breathing stops. Beads of sweat trickle down temples, palm are damp. Can she have survived her ordeal? Is she still alive? Suddenly, the magician speaks: “Ladies and gentlemen, I’m afraid you’ll just have to wait a while before you find out what happened.”

Recently I was the moderator for a panel discussion that was part of Calgary’s participation in the nationwide Arthur Ellis Crime Writing awards simultaneous shortlist announcements. The topic was “Not Your Grandmother’s Whodunit.” Over the course of the discussion the panelists and I examined the changing face of crime writing over the last century.

At one point in Widow’s Walk, the twenty-ninth novel in Robert B. Parker’s masterful series featuring Spenser, the Boston private eye, Spenser says to another character in the book, “In all the years I’ve known you, you haven’t aged any more than I have.”

    The joke in this remark is that at the time—Widow’s Walk is a 2002 book—Spenser would have been all of seventy-two years old!

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