Interview

Category: Interview

When Austin Clarke Met Malcolm X

Posted on February 25 by Kyle in Interview, News
In 1963, a young Austin Clarke, hoping to make his first mark as a journalist, travelled from Toronto to Harlem with two goals: first, to live among the people and capture an honest picture of what life was like for Harlem’s black community during a pivotal period in history (which resulted in the CBC Radio documentary Project 64: Harlem in Revolt), and, second, interviewing renowned author James Baldwin. Upon being informed that Baldwin was in Greece and therefore not available to be interviewed, a friend made a suggestion.
Tell us about your book. Marjorie, Too Afraid Too Cry is about my mother Marjorie, and while it tells about her not so unusual – as it turns out – experience of being a child migrant (home child) is also includes why it was not so unusual. For example – instead of her removal from her mother’s care being as a result of her mother failing her – a feeling that Marjorie carried with her for most of her life, I discovered that Britain’s policy of migrating their ‘unwanted’ children to the colonies was at the forefront and it was a practice that had been going on since 1618 when the Virginia Company took one hundred street children from the city of London to Virginia in order to supply labour to the plantation owners at Jamestown, Virginia.
Tell us about your book Ignored but not forgotten: Canada's English Immigrants is the third and final book in my trilogy The English in Canada. It tells the story of the later immigration from England to Canada during the later part of the nineteenth century and the early years of the twentieth century. The book covers English immigration to the whole of Canada. During this period the English were the largest immigrant group, their numbers far exceeding those from other countries. Although the English mainly preferred to settle in the growing Canadian town and cities they also took up the farming and land-owning opportunities offered to them. This was the period when the Prairie Provinces were being opened up for settlement and is a saga rich in human interest.
Tell us about your book. If I’ve accomplished what I set out to do, Polar Winds is an engaging look at a century of aviation in the North using as many northern voices as possible. It’s not just about the typical bush pilots you find in books and movies (although they certainly exist and make appearances!) but it looks at “balloonatics” during the Klondike gold rush, air tourists to the North Pole, military flyers during the Second World War and Cold War, as well as passengers, base managers, air mechanics, and so on. I tried above all to shine a light on the experiences of women, indigenous people, and others who are often left out of aviation history.

Kristine Scarrow talks Throwaway Girl

Posted on February 13 by Kyle in Interview, Teens
How did you come up with the idea for your work? Throwaway Girl gives readers a glimpse into the harsh realities of the kids who end up in foster care. My educational background is in Psychology and Social Work, and I’ve always had a passion for working with the marginalized in our society, which has influenced my writing in many ways. I grew up in one of the poorest neighbourhoods in Saskatoon and I was surrounded by examples of people living in disadvantaged conditions. From a young age I recognized that other kids weren’t as fortunate as I was, especially from the standpoint of having a strong, supportive family life. Adolescence is a challenging time even when you come from a supportive situation where you are provided for. I wrote this book from the perspective of someone having to navigate through life without having had a healthy, solid base from which to draw support from. I wanted Throwaway Girl to shed light on what life is like for kids who feel like they have nothing.
Tell us a little about the overarching theme of your work, and why you felt compelled to explore it. There are many interweaving themes within Since You’ve Been Gone; however, the major theme is that of resilience. Both Edie and Jermaine, as well as many other characters in the novel, demonstrate an incredible amount of resilience in the face of racism, poverty, domestic violence, and other forms of prejudice. It is a reminder of just how damaging and marginalizing assumptions can be. They often limit youth from reaching their full potential which is a tragedy for our entire society.
Barbara Fradkin

Literary Clarity with Barbara Fradkin

Posted on January 27 by Kyle in Interview, Mystery

Tell us about your book.

NONE SO BLIND examines justice itself, not in the abstract, but with all the flaws, biases, doubts, and best efforts of those who strive to carry it out. When a convicted college professor is found dead weeks after being released on parole, Ottawa Police Inspector Michael Green is forced to re-examine the case upon which his career and reputation were built.

 

How did you come up with the idea for this work?

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