Love Alone

Overview

Judith and Antoine were lovers for a brief time. Then, suddenly, brutally, it ended. Nine years later, they meet again and attempt to revive their old passion. They dream of rewriting their history and burning the memories that are still troubling their souls. But each remains obsessed with the other’s past and the beautiful dream transforms itself little by little into a prison, a shared bout of craziness into which even the reader finds himself irresistibly drawn. Eventually, the couple’s shared madness and jealousy turns homicidal. Kattan writes evocatively about the human heart, as well as the lethal nature of sexual passion.

Reviews

Love Alone strikes with its analytical strength and the subtlety of its sentimental reflections, which evoke Proust and Stendhal. In a masterly fashion, Emmanuel Kattan dissects the human psyche and, without compromise, follows his tale of extremity, which heads toward a morbid end.

Elsa Pepi, Ici

A deep and original work that has already established itself as one of the mustread books of this season.

Le Libraire

A sweeping love story...tragic, as it should be.

Danielle Laurin, Le Devoir

About the Authors

Emmanuel Kattan

Posted by Kendra on December 6, 2014
Emmanuel Kattan photo

Emmanuel Kattan

Born in Montreal, Emmanuel Kattan graduated with a Master’s of Philosophy from the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) in Paris. For four years, he served as the Public Affairs Advisor to the Secretary General of the Commonwealth of London and he is now a communications manager at the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations. He has two teenage sons, Benjamin and Jeremy.

Sheila Fischman

Posted by Kendra on December 6, 2014

Sheila Fischman

Sheila Fischman has translated into English over one hundred works by major Quebecois authors, among them Roch Carrier, Gaetan Soucy, Anne Hebert, Marie-Claire Blais, Yves Beauchemin and Michel Tremblay. Winner of many awards, she has been nominated on numerous occasions for the Governor-General's Literary Award for Translation and won it in 1998. Sheila Fischman is a Member of the Order of Canada. She lives in Montreal.