Unbuilt Toronto 2

Overview

Discover the scrapyard statue planned for University Avenue, the flapper-era "CN Tower" that led to a decade of litigation, and an electric light-rail transit network proposed in 1915.

Winner of the 2012 Heritage Toronto Award of Merit

Quill & Quire cited Unbuilt Toronto as a book filled with "well-researched, often gripping tales of grand plans," while Canadian Architect said that it is "an impressively researched exploration of never-realized architectural and master-planning projects intended for the city." Now Unbuilt Toronto 2 provides an all-new, fascinating return to the "Toronto that might have been."

Discover the scrapyard statue planned for University Avenue, the flapper-era "CN Tower" that led to a decade of litigation, and an electric light-rail transit network proposed in 1915. What would Toronto look like today if it had hosted the Olympics in 1996 or 1976? And what was the downtown expressway that Frederick Gardiner really wanted?

With over 150 photographs, maps, and illustrations, Unbuilt Toronto 2 tracks the origins and fates of some of the city’s most interesting planning, transit, and architectural "what-ifs."

Awards

Winner
Heritage Toronto Award of Merit
2012

Reviews

Unbuilt Toronto 2 is a treasure trove of lost projects that's every bit the rival of its predecessor. In fact, one could make the argument that it's even a tad more interesting on account of some of the lesser-known projects and plans that it sheds light on.

Canadianarchitect.com

The success of and positive response to Mark Osbaldestons first effort in 2008, Unbuilt Toronto: A History of the City That Might Have Been, left the author feeling like he wasnt quite yet finished with his research. As a consequence, in this second volume, Osbaldeston not only gives readers a more complete picture of how the city might be vastly different today, but also offers an intriguing behind-the-scenes account of the political machinations that either stymied or guaranteed the success of a number of undeniably significant architectural and urban design projects.

Canadian Architect Magazine

This sequel book examines over 150 years of plans for buildings, civic squares, city halls, and subways that Toronto and its citizens have long forgotten. Unbuilt Toronto 2 lets you imagine the city that could have been.

Spacing Magazine

Unbuilt Toronto 2 is a treasure trove of lost projects that's every bit the rival of its predecessor. In fact, one could make the argument that it's even a tad more interesting on account of some of the lesser-known projects and plans that it sheds light on.

Blogto.com

About the Author

Mark Osbaldeston

Posted by Kendra on December 6, 2014
Mark Osbaldeston photo

Mark Osbaldeston

A Hamilton native, Mark Osbaldeston has written and spoken extensively on architectural and planning history. His first book, Unbuilt Toronto, was the basis for an exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum and was a finalist for the Toronto Book Awards and the Speaker’s Book Award. It also received a Heritage Toronto Award of Merit, as did its sequel, Unbuilt Toronto 2.