Seeking a Better Future

Overview

Most emigration from England was voluntary, self-financed, and pursued by people who, while expecting to improve their economic prospects, were also critical of the areas in which they first settled.

The exodus from England that gathered pace during the 19th century accounted for the greatest part of the total emigration from Britain to Canada. And yet, while copious emigration studies have been undertaken on the Scots and the Irish, very little has been written about the English in Canada.

Drawing on wide-ranging data collected from English record offices and Canadian archives, Lucille Campey considers why people left England and traces their destinations in Ontario and Quebec. A mass of detailed information relating to pioneer settlements and ship crossings has been distilled to provide new insights on how, why, and when Ontario and Quebec acquired their English settlers. Challenging the widely held assumption that emigration was primarily a flight from poverty, Campey reveals how the ambitious and resourceful English were strongly attracted by the greater freedoms and better livelihoods that could be achieved by relocating to Canada’s central provinces.

Reviews

As with Lucille Campey’s previous books, Seeking a Better Future is a major addition to the literature for those looking for insight into their pioneer immigrant ancestor experience, in this case the English in Quebec and Ontario.

Anglo-Celtic Connections (August, 2012)

[Lucille Campey] has distilled a copious amount of research into an informative and engaging book that clearly addresses the English immigration to Upper and Lower Canada during the 1800s. I would highly recommend this book for those interested in this period of immigration to Canada.

The British Columbia Genealogist

About the Author

Lucille H. Campey

Posted by Kendra on October 30, 2014
Lucille H. Campey photo

Lucille H. Campey

Lucille H. Campey was born in Ottawa. A professional researcher and historian, she has a master’s degree in medieval history from Leeds University and a Ph.D. from Aberdeen University in emigration history. She is the author of eight books on early Scottish emigration to Canada and three on English emigration to Canada. She was the recipient of the 2016 Prix du Québec for her work researching Irish emigration to Canada.