Riding into Battle

Overview

The untold story of how Canadian Cyclists came into their own during the Hundred Days campaign of the Great War.

Cyclist troops in Canada’s armed forces spent most of the First World War digging trenches, patrolling roads, and delivering dispatches. But during the Hundred Days campaign at the end of the Great War, Canada’s Cyclist troops came into their own.

At Amiens, Cambrai, and especially the Pursuit from the Sensée, the Cyclists made pioneering contributions to the development of the Canadian Corps’s combined arms strategy and mobile warfare doctrine, all the while exhibiting the consummate professionalism the Corps became renowned for.

About the Author

Ted Glenn

Posted by Dundurn Guest on November 21, 2017
Ted Glenn photo

Ted Glenn

Ted Glenn is a professor at Humber College and writes about Canadian government and military history at home and abroad. He lives and cycles in Toronto.