Reluctant Dead

Overview

Murder casts a long shadow, reaching from fabled Easter Island in the South Pacific to the desolate shores of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Detective Miranda Quin of the Toronto Police Service takes time off to write a mystery in the tropics and gets trapped in a sinister plot with global implications. Her partner in homicide, David Morgan, is left alone to resolve the case of a beautiful corpse on a Toronto Island yacht and ends up precariously compromised in the mysterious North.

Their stories converge when they both return to Toronto. They discover themselves trapped in a labyrinth of deadly complexity, and the only way out is together. Much more than their own survival depends on it. Islands, they learn, are an illusion. Everything connects, especially when murder is involved.

Reviews

It's clear that John Moss has a winning combo. Quin and Morgan are professionally and fictionally workable, and Reluctant Dead is the best so far.

Globe and Mail (June, 2011)

The author's murder methods are unique and challenge the reader, and his humour is wry and intelligent.

Reviewingtheevidence.com (June, 2011)

...intricate, erudite and cleverly written. Readers who share Moss's taste in the unique will enjoy his novel.

The London Free Press (August, 2011)

In the annals of fictional crime detection, Quin and Morgan are unique. I can hardly wait to see where theyll get to in the next installment of their weird and wonderful careers.

Towncrier.com (August, 2011)

…the super intelligent repartee between detective sergeants David Morgan and Miranda Quin makes the plot almost irrelevant. Keeping up with the twists, turns, and tangents in their conversation is a work of detection in itself.

Millbrook Times

About the Author

John Moss

Posted by Kendra on December 6, 2014
John Moss photo

John Moss

John Moss is the author of two dozen books, including Invisible Among the Ruins and Being Fiction, a collection short stories. His Quin and Morgan mysteries explore the breadth of a full life and its inevitably awkward end. Moss is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He lives in Peterborough, Ontario.