Keeping Our Word

Overview

A compelling solution to heal the rift between Canada and First Nations communities.

Canada prides itself on being a nation to whom a troubled, conflicted world can look for inspiration. Tolerance, diversity, equality, honesty, and compassion … all are virtues Canada claims are parts of its cultural DNA. Yet Canada’s relationships with its First Peoples (First Nations, Inuit, and Metis) are badly fractured, with distrust and profound disharmony their defining features. Whether Canada acts to honour the promises exchanged in the 1764 Treaty of Niagara, promises that have been violated, ignored, or forgotten for 250 years, will define us forever.

Keeping Our Word offers a clear way forward. Canada could never have existed without its formative First Peoples’ partnerships. Our word must be kept, and our bargains honoured, or Canada will be exposed as a failed experiment built on a broken promise.

About the Authors

Michael Coyle

Posted by Dundurn Guest on February 7, 2017
Michael Coyle photo

Michael Coyle

Michael Coyle is an internationally renowned expert in aboriginal law and dispute resolution scholarship. A Western University Law faculty Associate Professor and mediator, he has authored numerous works exploring Indigenous peoples’ legal issues, including First Nations’ land claims and treaty interpretation. He lives in London, Ontario.

Bryan Davies

Posted by Dundurn Guest on May 10, 2016
Bryan Davies photo

Bryan Davies

Bryan Davies is a writer, commentator, and creative works consultant. Author of several hundred articles spanning history, law, sport, and politics, in 2013 he and Andrew Traficante co-founded Tagona Creative, a successful Canadian creative-works incubator. Bryan is also a founding partner with United Front Entertainment, a Canadian film distribution and content development enterprise. Bryan lives in Whitby, Ontario.

Andrew Traficante

Posted by Dundurn Guest on May 10, 2016
Andrew Traficante photo

Andrew Traficante

Andrew Traficante teaches high school with the Algoma District School Board in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. Recently, Andrew wrote and researched an online exhibit exploring the Sault’s industrial heritage for the Virtual Museum of Canada