November 2017

Dundurn Press is pleased to announce that Dr. Oronhyatekha: Security, Justice, and Equality by co-authors Keith Jamieson and Michelle A. Hamilton has been shortlisted for the 2017 Speaker’s Book Award. The book is one of 9 shortlisted titles, which can be viewed here.

At Dundurn we publish many series, mostly in the mystery category (though we have also developed quite a few in other categories, such as the immensely popular Weird Stories Gone Wrong books for kids and the political science series Point of View to name a couple). Mystery is a genre that has great potential for series development, as its devoted readers often expect their favourite characters to return for more sleuthing for years to come.

Eleanor Wish got gunned down in Hong Kong.

Eleanor was the ex-wife of Harry Bosch, the LAPD detective at the centre of Michael Connelly’s absorbing series of crime novels, and though her murder was hardly the typical fate of the wives and girlfriends of homicide detectives and private eyes in crime fiction, it’s still true that many women, maybe most, who hook up with sleuth figures don’t find especially happy endings in their relationships.

No, this isn’t a real-estate blog, but the familiar mantra is just as relevant to fiction, where the setting can be as central to a novel as one of the characters. As a reader, I love books that transport me to foreign settings, whether they conjure up memories of places I’ve been before or introduce me to somewhere new. And I’m far from alone. There’s a reason writers like Jo Nesbo, Ann Cleeves, and Mark Billingham are so popular with North American readers, just as Michael Connolly and Louise Penny are beloved in Europe.

Randy Richmond’s lively history of the City of Orillia has won an Orillia Museum of Art & History Award. The illustrated history book The Orillia Spirit won in the category Historical Publications and/or Research. The award was presented in a ceremony at the Museum on November 9.

Uncovering The Roma Plot

Posted on November 9 by Mario Bolduc in Mystery

After sending con artist Max O’Brien to India for his first mission (The Kashmir Trap, 2016), I wanted to use this character in a second book. I did not want to follow with a sequel, but a standalone story that would send Max in a different location. The situation of the Romani people immediately appealed to me. First of all, they originate from India and have travelled across the world for many centuries – which made a nice thematic link to The Kashmir Trap. Secondly, their fate during the Holocaust was not widely known.

We usually think that war is decided by mighty battles and often it is. In the Second World War such battles as El Alamein, Stalingrad and Midway all had decisive effects on Allied victory. However, I wanted to write the book Ten Decisions to show that if you stand back and look at the Second World War, many of the decisions that mattered most, ones which were the most far-reaching, were not always made on the battlefield.

When the Canadian federal election was called for December 17, 1917, most Canadian women west of Quebec already had the provincial vote and, in most parts of the country, they had earned the right to vote and hold municipal office. It is clear that even without the First World War the right to vote federally would soon be realized. Both major political parties were on record supporting the cause and Canadians were well aware of the international currents promoting women’s rights.