July 2017

Capital punishment, or the execution of someone found guilty of a crime, dates back to the arrival of European explorers on Canadian shores. Historically, punishment for serious crimes included hanging, death by firing squad, and burning at the stake. But by the time the Dominion of Canada was established in 1867, one method was available for the capital crimes of murder, rape, and treason:  hanging.

#InsideDundurn with Sheila

Posted on July 19 by Kyle in News

Are you ready for a history lesson in Canadian publishing? Today we’re talking to someone who’s been in the business for a very long time, Dundurn’s manager of contracts and administrative services, Kirk Howard’s executive assistant, and our colourful resident fashionista, Sheila Douglas.

“I’ve been working for 44 years,” Sheila says, “And exactly half of that I’ve spent in publishing.”

“You boys have told a good one!” Such was the sentiment that greeted Andrew Traficante and I when we made our way to Newfoundland in support of our recently published book, A Boy from Botwood. With kind assistance from Dundurn’s Michelle Melski, our schedule permitted us to catch up with Frank Gogos, the remarkable, engaging Royal Newfoundland Regiment Museum curator and author, in St. John’s and meet some terrific regional booksellers (such as the Downhome Shoppe, pictured here) who are carrying our work.

I love going to conferences. I love travelling and touring too, but there’s something about attending a conference, or any organized event that’s scheduled over an intense short period of time, in a new place, that makes life thrum in a different way. There’s a certain group of people all there for the same reason – but all with different agendas and perspectives. Some are the movers and shakers, the bigwigs, the celebrities of whatever group you are with. Their agendas are more obvious. There are things that you want, too. You schmooze, you connect, learn.

There are moments that can be called classic Orillia, and the reasons why I will always love the place.

Its leaders and ordinary citizens have always striven to make their hometown unique, and that’s led to inventions and movements ahead of their time.

But that same spirit has led to some amusing battles and derailed the ordinary achievements that other cities accomplish with less effort.

In the second edition of The Orillia Spirit: An Illustrated History, the classic Orillia moment comes with the battle to build a long-sought recreation centre.

Hello from Crime Writers of Canada

Posted on July 10 by Kyle in News

Thanks to Dundurn for giving Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) this chance to connect, especially this year when Canada will be celebrating its 150th birthday, CWC will celebrate its 35th anniversary, and Bouchercon will be held in Canada too. It sounds as though it’s going to be a very Canadian year! On behalf of our more than 300 members I’d like to let you know you’ll be extremely welcome if you choose to visit us this year – at our website, by reading our work, or in person.

It’s always difficult to get everything that you want into a book. In the case of the Second Edition of The Ontario Craft Beer Guide, Robin and I trailed around all over the province in order to taste beer at well over 200 breweries. We revisited the majority of the brewers who were in their second year of operation because we wanted readers to understand that there is a sharp uptick in brewing quality year over year from the point when breweries open.