April 2017

Every poet from William Shakespeare to John Lennon has tried to define love. They all failed. Good. To precisely define a concept of such profundity is to trivialize and cheapen it. Such is the also the case with other notions of importance, and among them is community. The concept of community is being tested today in countries and companies and schools. Perhaps we owe it to ourselves to walk the poet’s mile toward community’s unattainable definition with the hope that the existential journey affords wisdom, or at least grace.

Dundurn Press is thrilled that four of our authors were nominated for the Arthur Ellis Awards this year! Sponsored by the Crime Writers of Canada, the awards honour the best in Canadian crime, mystery, detective, and thriller literature.

We're happy to say that of the three awards our authors were shortlisted for, two winners emerged! Look below to see the nominees and winners!
 

Memoir of a Marketing Intern

Posted on April 24 by calyssa in News

Wow, no one told me April was almost over. That means my internship is drawing to a close, and it’s time for me to write this farewell to you, reader. Over the last four months I’ve been working behind the scenes: putting events on the website, writing press releases, and sending out newsletters, just to name a few.

Writing a non-fiction book, for me, begins with developing a clear focus on the subject and creating an outline that describes in detail the progression of the argument. But that is just the beginning. Once I finish the research and begin to write, the book takes on a life of its own. The months of immersion in a project helps to bring it alive, deepen my understanding of the subject, and breathe life into the book.

 

Yes, the lakes may still be ice-covered, and shrinking snowbanks might yet line the roads, but the spring season in Canada’s western mountains may be the optimal time to board one of the spectacular train excursions to explore the canyons and peaks of Canada’s finest scenery.

After all, it is the time of year when daylight extends well into the evening and busloads of tour groups have yet to clog the attractions.

#InsideDundurn with Laura

Posted on April 18 by Kyle in Interview
You can’t judge a book by its cover. That’s how the old saying goes, and it’s true. But a good cover does help you pick up that book to judge it later. That’s part of the work of the book’s designer. We’re going into our design and production team for this Inside Dundurn. Meet Laura, our Senior Designer.

Salvage by Stephen Maher has been shortlisted for Best Paperback Original Novel for the ITW Thriller Awards.  The 2017 ITW Thriller Award Winners will be announced at ThrillerFest XII, July 15, 2017, at the Grand Hyatt (New York City).

ABOUT SALVAGE

Pat Nogier: A Reflection

Posted on April 11 by Kyle

It was March 20 at 8:08 a.m., when the NHL’s Winnipeg Jets tweeted that they were recalling defenceman Nelson Nogier from their AHL affiliate, the Manitoba Moose, for a game the next night against the visiting Philadelphia Flyers.

Shortly afterwards, Pat Nogier, Nelson’s father, retweeted the message. After that, you have to think he got busy making arrangements to get himself and his wife, Lori, to Winnipeg.

The Nogiers are from Saskatoon, where Pat carries the title of Inspector with the Saskatoon Police Service. He has been with the SPS since 1993.

Tony Westell 1926 - 2017

Posted on April 11 by Kyle in News

We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Tony Westell.

A lifelong newsman and journalist, Anthony Westell joined the Globe and Mail in 1956, becoming a member of the editorial board, and then Ottawa Bureau Chief. He joined the Toronto Star as the national affairs columnist in 1969 and later moved to Carleton University's prestigious Journalism school to teach his profession. Eventually, he moved on to become director of the School of Journalism and Associate Dean of Arts.

Dundurn Press has just released Foreign Voices in the House, a striking book published ahead of Canada’s 150th anniversary. Its 600 pages are filled with, among other things, the major speeches 64 world leaders like Nelson Mandela, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Boris Yeltsin, and Barack Obama delivered in our House of Commons over the past century. Alongside pithy bios of each leader, illustrated with the dramatic Parliament Hill photos of these history-makers, are many surprising facts about them, which you might never have suspected.

While the future of the world weighed on his mind, a corporal in the middle of the Great War noted that life goes on.

In the spring of 1917, as he and the entire Canadian Corps prepared for the greatest battle of their lives, Ellis Sifton, a twenty-five-year-old farm boy from Wallacetown, Ontario, stopped to notice familiar activity in the French countryside. Despite the approaching Easter offensive against German armies entrenched on Vimy Ridge, he noted in letters home that the planting season in France would go ahead no matter what.

I grew up with a ghost. We all did in our family — the ghost of Billy Bishop — and that has meant for interesting times.

Like his other four grandchildren, I never knew my famous grandfather, the highly decorated First World War flying ace. I was only three years old when Billy died at the age of 62. But for our family, and as someone who has achieved almost mythical status in the annals of Canadian history, it feels as if grandpa Billy is still around, continuing to live on with us in spirit, shaping each of our lives in ways that we did not expect.

Written in the Ruins by Paul Chiasson has been nominated for the 2017 Dartmouth Book Award for Non-Fiction, part of the Atlantic Book Awards. The Dartmouth Book Award honours books published which have contributed the most to the enjoyment and understanding of Nova Scotia and its people.

In many ways, The Unbroken Machine began out of my own frustrations as a parliamentary journalist as to the kinds of lapses that I see around me on a daily basis. I see MPs who don’t understand their jobs and who burn all kinds of time and energy on things that aren’t their responsibility. I see my fellow journalists struggling to properly cover certain events without having a proper grounding in how our parliamentary system works, leading them to import American terms and ideas as though they were interchangeable with our own.

Jack McLaren almost went to war without his most vital weapon. As it was, when he enlisted in 1914, the army recruiting office in Toronto had no uniforms, no rifles, and few training facilities. A fine arts graduate and amateur playwright, J.W. (as he was known) dashed to join Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in September 1915. In his kit he carried his personal effects, foolscap for his diary, a few sketch boards, water colour paints and brushes. And because he thought they just might come in handy, he also packed some writing paper and theatrical makeup.

Acclaimed children’s author Philippa Dowding’s Myles and the Monster Outside has been named a finalist in the Saskatchewan Young Readers Choice Awards in the Diamond Willow Category. Myles is the second book in Dowding’s short fiction series Weird Stories Gone Wrong.