October 2016

When people ask me how I came to write a novel — And Then the Sky Exploded — about the bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945, and the devastation that followed,  I have to be honest and admit I’m not really sure.

October 20, 2016 ― The woman who led the successful national campaign to have women depicted on Canadian money has been awarded the 2016 Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media (Pierre Berton Award). Merna Forster’s campaign resulted in a petition of more than 73,000 names and a commitment from the prime minister to feature a woman from Canadian history on bank notes in 2018.

DID YOUR KNOW? Both the books mentioned in this post qualify for 25% off!Use promo code: remember at checkout. How did you come up with the idea for the book Australia and Canada in Afghanistan?

It's a collection of papers delivered at a conference to my colleagues at the Graham Centre held at the University of Toronto two years ago, in partnership with the Canadian Forces College and the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy.

We Remember

Posted on October 20 by Kyle

We remember tales of battles past; stories of monumental moments that shaped history and the people who lived them.

It's no surprise that we at Dundurn strive to help define Canada with such stories. 

Immerse yourself in some history this fall.

From October 11, 2016 - November 11, 2016, get 25% off select paperback history books! Use promo code: REMEMBER

 

Ever since visiting and illustrating Toronto’s 100 libraries, my love of public libraries has grown even more. 

As a traveller, a public library is the best place to go!

Now, when I’m travelling outside Toronto to cities near and far, I take time to visit their local libraries. 

We are delighted to announce that Myles and the Monster Outside by Toronto author Philippa Dowding and illustrator Shawn Daigle has been nominated for the Silver Birch Express Award, part of the Ontario Library Association’s annual Forest of Reading program.

I am fascinated by the ideas of Synchronicity and Chaos Theory: that everyone is connected to every other one (genetically, coincidentally, necessarily, or randomly), and that every action has a consequence, from the seen to the unseen, from the sublime to the catastrophic. The idea that there can be a causal relationship between the flutter of a butterfly's wing and the typhoon halfway around the world is, to me, both poetic and profound, and this is the idea that connects all of the stories in Rockets Versus Gravity.

I live by this rule: the worse my mood, the more important my workout. I know that my future self will always be happier — and healthier both physically and psychologically — if I move. Some type of daily movement is — like brushing my teeth or telling my mom that I love her — a daily “non-negotiable.”

In her third adventure, In Over Her Head, Hannah Smart sets sail for the Treasure Coast, where she and a team of treasure hunters search for long lost riches, hidden for centuries under the sea. 

But what is this treasure and how did it get there in the first place? 

Early in the book, Patrice de la Fontaine (the flamboyant and high-strung director of Teenage Treasure Hunters) shares the story of The Queen’s Jewels, spinning a wild tale of intrigue, greed, and death.

Happy World Teachers Day

Posted on October 5 by Kyle in News

Recently, it seems like we celebrate everything – national black cat day, national coffee day, and national book lovers’ day to name a few (check out www.daysoftheyear.com for more obscure observances). On October 5th, we’re celebrating World Teachers’ Day – an important global observance created by UNESCO to celebrate the role teachers play in providing quality education.

Ten Novels? Never!

Posted on October 4 by Don Easton

Hello, my name is Don Easton and I am the author of the Jack Taggart Mystery series. This year is a milestone for me (and no doubt my editor) with the release of my 10th novel, A Delicate Matter. I never believed or even allowed myself to dream that I would write that many books. When I first started writing I thought I had what it took to get one novel published –– but ten? Don’t be ridiculous. No way!