June 2016

We are thrilled to announce that The Order of Canada has appointed two of our authors, Ken Armson and Mark Cullen into its ranks. 

Ken Armson, Officer, is the author of The Legacy of John Waldie and Sons. Ken Armson is a professional forester who taught and conducted research in forestry at the University of Toronto for 26 years. He has a special interest in forest history and retired from the role of Ontario's Provincial Forester in 1989. He is also the author of Ontario Forests: A Historical Perspective, published in 2001.

What struck me at this year's Lambda Awards was the diversity of the award headings, spanning twenty-six categories from lesbian non-fiction through bisexual poetry, LGBTQ anthology, trans literature to gay mystery, and just about everything in between.

Today, as we know, the Lambda Awards gloriously celebrate the best of LGBTQ writing and "affirm that LGBTQ stories are part of the literature of the world."

It wasn't always like that.

Every author needs them and every author dreads them, but when I saw the review in the April 2016 edition of the Literary Review of Canada, I was delighted.

Sara Mojtehedzadeh is a reporter for the Toronto Star, where she writes about labour issues and precarious work. She entitled her review Hello Girls: A strike by women workers that energized Canada’s labour movement.

Since Cracked: How telephone operators took on Canada’s largest corporation and won! was published at the end of 2015. I have received great feedback.

First off some readers let me know that they felt it was an easy read.  That is important because I wrote it as a history book with 300 footnotes.  Evidence-based history can be daunting for lay readers, so I was immensely pleased that the general reader could find it readable and continue to the end.

Cracked: How the telephone operators took on Canada's largest corporation and won! This is my third book but my first time writing history. I wrote the book as a result of going to a birthday party for one of the principal organizers mentioned in the book.  A number of the people involved in the campaign and strike were there and after food, cake and a few drinks, we reminisced about the events featured in Cracked.

Dundurn Press is pleased to announce that Joan M. Roberts has won the 2016 Alison Prentice Award presented by the Ontario Historical Society for Cracked: How Telephone Operators Took on Canada’s Largest Corporation ... And Won. The award honours the best book on women’s history in Ontario, published in the past three years.

Caroline Di Cocco delivered this introduction at the June 11, 2016 OHS Award Ceremony.

I’m currently sitting at my desk looking over the weathered notebook that was my constant companion throughout the creation of The Ontario Craft Beer Guide. Every pub, every brewery, every beer that I was around, my notebook was always with me. Among the notes and impressions I had on the individual beers, I also included some of the lessons I learned while doing my part in putting this guide together. The biggest one, of course, is how far Ontario has come in beer selection.

It's time for baseball, books, and...BEER! As summer approaches quickly, restaurant patios are opening and you’ll want to know about the best brews to drink. The Ontario Craft Beer Guide authors, Robin LeBlanc and Jordan St. John, had the tough job of sampling some of Ontario's best and worst. Recently, the beer aficionados spoke with Josh Rubin of the Toronto Star about Ontario breweries, the future beer scene, and their favourites. LeBlanc also shares the duo’s best picks for what to drink this summer – hint – they’re a pilsner, pale ale, and wheat beer.