2016

White Jade Tiger

To celebrate the upcoming 25th anniversary of White Jade Tiger, Dundurn is publishing a new edition — complete with a brand new cover. The text got a makeover too.

It’s not often (actually never) that I get to tweak a manuscript years after it’s been published. I’d reread the book a few times, but one reads differently in editor mode, and I was astounded by what I discovered. It wasn’t the typos (a couple) or unnecessary space breaks or excessive adjectives (that I happily cut). It was the memories.

How did you get the idea for the Daughters of Light series?

The idea for the character of Jasmine originated from a student in my homeroom class who was being bullied so badly outside of class, she’d hide in her closet so that her mother would think she’d gone to school. This student’s mother had lupus, so the student didn’t want to worry her mum by telling anyone about the bullying.

There are actually two different questions in the title of this post. The first is: why is this book necessary? The origins of its argument about Canadian defence procurement can be traced all the way back to the late 1970s. Shortly after I was hired by McMaster University in 1976 to teach in the political science department, the Liberal government of Pierre Elliott Trudeau decided to buy a new fighter aircraft for Air Command (as the Royal Canadian Air Force was known back then). One of my new colleagues, Michael M.

Honouring Dr.O with Beth Bruder

Posted on December 13 by Kyle

Growing up in Belleville, Ontario close to Tyendinega, Mohawk country, it was not until I went to high school and met the students from Tyendinega that I was aware of this First Nation so close by. Even then I knew little of Mohawk culture or their contribution to Canada. History taught in 1960s Ontario high schools was British, American and little else. A missed opportunity.

So the Chicago Cubs beat the Cleveland Indians to win the World Series. When we think about it, “Indians” is a strange nickname for a sports team. Sports teams generally use animals, symbols, or mythical figures as nicknames: the Toronto Blue Jays, the Calgary Stampeders, B.C. Lions, Winnipeg Jets, Calgary Flames, Edmonton Oilers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Montreal Expos, etc.

Writing Unbuilt Hamilton was a homecoming for me. Quite literally. I live in Toronto now, but during a leave I took from my day job to research the book, I spent a lot of time staying with my father — in what turned out to be the final months of his life — in the house in Hamilton I had grown up in. It was appropriate. Decades earlier, that house had started me on the path to the book I was writing.

Canadian authors telling Canadian stories; that's what we love. So naturally, we're thrilled to have a total of five books recognized on the Speaker’s Book Award shortlist. From biographies to current events, these are books that celebrate Ontarians making their mark in this province. Nominees for the Speaker’s Book Award include:

Finding Your Fit 5-Day Giveaway

Posted on November 28 by Kyle

How do you plan to find your fit over the holiday season? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram!

5 lucky entrants will each win a copy of Kathleen Trotter's Finding Your Fit.

How do you enter?

Just header over to Dundurn on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram and follow us and share the Finding Your Fit photo pinned to the top any time this week.

Good Luck!

My visit to Pembroke on Saturday, November 19, to sign copies of Combat Mission Kandahar at Coles Books was great. Books were sold and I had many discussions with passers-by. These discussions included not only local residents but also present and past members of the military who either live in Pembroke or were in town from CFB Petawawa for a few hours. I was quite pleased that some of the presently serving soldiers, who I am sure know Afghanistan better than I do, wanted to buy the book.

A recent report indicated that 86% of street drugs tested at Insite, the safe injection site in Vancouver,  contain fentanyl, a powerful opioid that can make people sick and even kill them. There are many reasons to end the War on Drugs and to shift from criminalization to legalization and regulation.  A main one is to prevent those who use drugs from being poisoned by tainted substances.

"Cases of poisoning happen all too frequently."

 

DON BRAID: After more than a year's work, the big majority of it by co-author Sydney Sharpe, our book Notley Nation is coming to the bookstores.

SYDNEY SHARPE: Don Braid and I have written three books together. A marriage can only handle one book per decade. (I leave the math to you.) The other five I somehow managed on my own.

RIELLE BRAID: After quite some time of watching my badass mother and father (Don Braid and Sydney Sharpe) work their butts off, their new book is finally out and ready to be read by you!

The concept for Missing Piece, the final book of my Spell Crossed trilogy, wound up radiating through not only the plot and the characters but the form the novel took and the process of writing it.

Two of the main characters, Xemion and Tharfen, have previously had a collision in the frictionless borough of Shissilill. As a result, they have each come away with a piece of the other magically embedded in them. Much of the action of the book tells the tale of how Tharfen goes about trying to recover her missing piece.

The War of 1812 was barely over when the people of York Mills felled the trees that would become the first St. John’s Anglican Church. Built in 1816 on land that had been donated by pioneer settlers Joseph and Catherine Shepard, the little log church was the first outpost of St. James church in the Town of York and the first parish church in what would one day become the City of Toronto.

We Remember Battle Stories

Posted on November 3 by Kyle

In honour of Remembrance Day, we’re reading up on the men and women who have served in some of the most iconic battles that echo through world history to the present day.

The Battle Stories series was written by renowned experts and complete with quotes, photographs and detailed maps, each Battle Story offers readers clear insight into the unfolding action. 

Don't Forget: Between October 11 - Nov 11, 2016, you can use promo code REMEMBER for 25% off select Battle Stories books!

 

Travelling through South Korea, it never fails to surprise me that its tourism sector shows almost no inclination to create accommodation, facilities and amenities that appeal to North American and European vacation tastes. Not that South Korea necessarily needs to cater to the West’s vacation value system. The Asian nation receives about 12 million tourists annually, the vast bulk from China and Japan, and only a pittance from Europe and North America. If South Korea could tap into this market, its tourism numbers could escalate.

National Authors' Day

Posted on November 1 by Irina

On National Authors’ Day, we’d like to thank authors for transporting us to new and old worlds with their writing. Thanks to them, our imaginations are given wings to fly on adventures without us ever having to leave the comfort of our reading nooks.

"The way they can weave words into such vivid imagery and make us feel so connected to the characters and places they write about will always amaze me."

 

When people ask me how I came to write a novel — And Then the Sky Exploded — about the bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945, and the devastation that followed,  I have to be honest and admit I’m not really sure.

October 20, 2016 ― The woman who led the successful national campaign to have women depicted on Canadian money has been awarded the 2016 Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media (Pierre Berton Award). Merna Forster’s campaign resulted in a petition of more than 73,000 names and a commitment from the prime minister to feature a woman from Canadian history on bank notes in 2018.

DID YOUR KNOW? Both the books mentioned in this post qualify for 25% off!Use promo code: remember at checkout. How did you come up with the idea for the book Australia and Canada in Afghanistan?

It's a collection of papers delivered at a conference to my colleagues at the Graham Centre held at the University of Toronto two years ago, in partnership with the Canadian Forces College and the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy.

We Remember

Posted on October 20 by Kyle

We remember tales of battles past; stories of monumental moments that shaped history and the people who lived them.

It's no surprise that we at Dundurn strive to help define Canada with such stories. 

Immerse yourself in some history this fall.

From October 11, 2016 - November 11, 2016, get 25% off select paperback history books! Use promo code: REMEMBER

 

Ever since visiting and illustrating Toronto’s 100 libraries, my love of public libraries has grown even more. 

As a traveller, a public library is the best place to go!

Now, when I’m travelling outside Toronto to cities near and far, I take time to visit their local libraries. 

We are delighted to announce that Myles and the Monster Outside by Toronto author Philippa Dowding and illustrator Shawn Daigle has been nominated for the Silver Birch Express Award, part of the Ontario Library Association’s annual Forest of Reading program.

I am fascinated by the ideas of Synchronicity and Chaos Theory: that everyone is connected to every other one (genetically, coincidentally, necessarily, or randomly), and that every action has a consequence, from the seen to the unseen, from the sublime to the catastrophic. The idea that there can be a causal relationship between the flutter of a butterfly's wing and the typhoon halfway around the world is, to me, both poetic and profound, and this is the idea that connects all of the stories in Rockets Versus Gravity.

I live by this rule: the worse my mood, the more important my workout. I know that my future self will always be happier — and healthier both physically and psychologically — if I move. Some type of daily movement is — like brushing my teeth or telling my mom that I love her — a daily “non-negotiable.”

In her third adventure, In Over Her Head, Hannah Smart sets sail for the Treasure Coast, where she and a team of treasure hunters search for long lost riches, hidden for centuries under the sea. 

But what is this treasure and how did it get there in the first place? 

Early in the book, Patrice de la Fontaine (the flamboyant and high-strung director of Teenage Treasure Hunters) shares the story of The Queen’s Jewels, spinning a wild tale of intrigue, greed, and death.

Happy World Teachers Day

Posted on October 5 by Kyle in News

Recently, it seems like we celebrate everything – national black cat day, national coffee day, and national book lovers’ day to name a few (check out www.daysoftheyear.com for more obscure observances). On October 5th, we’re celebrating World Teachers’ Day – an important global observance created by UNESCO to celebrate the role teachers play in providing quality education.

Ten Novels? Never!

Posted on October 4 by Don Easton

Hello, my name is Don Easton and I am the author of the Jack Taggart Mystery series. This year is a milestone for me (and no doubt my editor) with the release of my 10th novel, A Delicate Matter. I never believed or even allowed myself to dream that I would write that many books. When I first started writing I thought I had what it took to get one novel published –– but ten? Don’t be ridiculous. No way!

So You Want to Rent Rich?

Posted on September 19 by Kyle

“Why rent when you can buy?” More than any other, this phrase captures the overwhelmingly unanimous promotion of home ownership to Canadians. Real estate agents, mortgage brokers, family, friends, and even the government promote ownership as a safe, attractive, and sure-fire path to personal wealth. This one-size-fits-all advice ignores the reality of Canada’s housing market. 

Canadians deserve better advice. Take a look at this nifty infographic to get you started.

#InsideDundurn with Kendra

Posted on September 14 by Kyle in Interview

Introducing one of the newest additions to Dundurn’s marketing team, meet Kendra. If anyone fits the idiom of “wearing many hats”, it’s her. Not only is she a publicist, but also Dundurn’s marketing administrator.

“As a publicist, I work with authors for everything marketing, which is a new thing for me at Dundurn,” Kendra says, “As the marketing administrator, I’m in charge of all our metadata, making sure it’s correct, put out on time, stuff like that. I also help with proofing and copy-writing.”

My decision to write a book about my 50 political campaigns was influenced by a couple things. First. a desire to share a number of the lessons that I have learned along the way with future candidates and campaign managers and second, to provide entertaining reading for the many political junkies who enjoy hearing about what really happened behind the scenes in many important election or leadership campaigns.

New People and Places

Posted on September 6 by Barbara Fradkin in Mystery

But fifteen years is a long time for a writer to spend with the same characters in the same place. I wanted to travel. I wanted to meet new people. So I put him, his long-suffering wife, and his loyal colleagues on the shelf, left the complex, subtly hued city of Ottawa, and set off into the wilderness, both literally and figuratively.

#InsideDundurn with Shannon

Posted on August 24 by Kyle in Interview

If anyone is the authority on how to get published, it’s likely an acquisitions editor. So in that case, meet Shannon. Possibly one of the more glamorous jobs in publishing, Shannon’s job is to find and acquire books however she can. But unlike most people looking for a new book, she isn’t checking the local bookstore.

“Books can come from all kinds of places, really,” Shannon says matter-of-factly, “Literary agents, the slush pile, from any number of contacts. Sometimes authors that we’ve already published will refer others who are looking for a house.”

I bought my second sailboat, the first one big enough to sleep on, in 2003 when I was living in Halifax working as an editor at The Chronicle Herald.

 

It was a 1982 Tanzer 7.5, a beat-up 24-foot fibreglass boat, and when I bought it, it was sitting on the hard, as sailors say, in Chester, on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, an hour from Halifax.

 

Promised Land

Promised Land

Posted on August 15 by Vicki Delany in News

The Great Klondike Gold Rush was largely a journalistic event.

That there was gold in the Yukon was not exactly a big secret before the strike at Bonanza Creek. People had been mining there and finding gold for more than twenty years.  So what happened in 1897 that set off a worldwide rush that saw tens of thousands, probably hundreds of thousands, of people from all parts of the world packing up all their worldly belongings and rushing into the wilderness? Media.

Today on the Dundurn blog we are excited to be talking to Shawna Daigle, a children’s book illustrator for Philippa Dowding’s Weird Stories Gone Wrong series of middle-grade fiction. We asked Shawna about her collaboration with authors and her inspiration. Here’s what she had to say...

KYLE: Philippa Dowding has been a Dundurn author for a few years now; how did you get involved with her?

SHAWNA: I’ve known her for quite a few years through some close family friends. She approached me to do some illustration work for her.

 

Memoir From a Marketing Intern

Memoir From a Marketing Intern

Posted on August 9 by Erin

Hello fellow readers,

My name is Erin and I’m the Marketing Intern here at Dundurn. When I first got this position I jumped for joy, then I got down to business. What practical skills do I bring to the table? What do I want to learn? When do I get to network?

Like many others, my interest in publishing stems from a love and study of English Literature in university. From there, it brought me to South Korea where I dissected the English language word for word.

Simply put, curiosity. I have been curious about military history since I can remember. My sense of history is especially attracted to what is happening now. When Canada was drawn into warfare in Afghanistan, I sensed that this was history in the making. I had to find out everything I could about what was going on there, about what our soldiers were facing, and what they were doing about it.

In 1988 VIA Rail launched an all-daylight tour train known as the Rocky Mountaineer between Jasper and Vancouver, giving riders unequalled views of Canada’s most stunning mountain scenery.

But in 1990, when Brian Mulroney’s Conservative government slashed VIA’s routes by half, the Mountaineer was sold to the Great Canadian Rail Tour Company. Today the railway offers four scenic all-daylight routes through mountain passes and along the steep canyon walls of Canada’s western mountain ranges.

In Memory of Terry Boyle

Posted on July 21 by Kyle in News

Terry Boyle was an accomplished man. He was a Canadian author, lecturer, and teacher who shared his passion for history and folklore in many books since 1976, including four Haunted Ontario titles. He hosted television’s Creepy Canada and radio’s Discover Ontario on Classical 103.1 FM. Terry hosted the popular Entwood Tours, historic and haunted guided walks in Parry Sound and Bala, Ontario nearly every summer season. 

Truly an accomplished man, we were saddened to hear of his passing on Monday, July 11, 2016. He was 63 years old.

When I set out to write Justin Trudeau’s biography, I knew it would be challenging. It would mean countless interviews, in-depth pre-Internet research and analysis. As a contemporary politician who was freshly elected as the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in April 2013 and wanted to become prime minister, there was little to go on. Unlike his father who had written at an early age, Justin Trudeau had not left a trail of articles about his perspective on politics, on governing, or on the issues of the day.

Our bodies are ours to control, free from state interference – or so it appears. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms provides: “Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.”

Let me begin with a pep talk. No matter how good it is, your book will not sell itself. If your aim is to sell books – either to make money, or simply to share your story with a wider audience – then you must become your book’s best friend, advocate, and business partner.

Through trial and error, I have discovered what works for me – at least, what I think works. There’s a saying that ten percent of all your marketing efforts pay off, but nobody knows which ten percent!

 

1. Do understand your publisher’s role

As they do every year on November 11, members of the Britannia Yacht Club in Ottawa’s West End remember those who lost their lives in defense of our country. Facing Lac Deschenes, standing bareheaded before the flagpole, they unsuccessfully attempt to shelter against the biting wind while the Sea Cadet bugler plays “Last Post” and the Commodore recites “In Flanders Fields”. If one listens carefully, out on the water, the sound of a World War II flying boat taking off can be heard.

We are thrilled to announce that The Order of Canada has appointed two of our authors, Ken Armson and Mark Cullen into its ranks. 

Ken Armson, Officer, is the author of The Legacy of John Waldie and Sons. Ken Armson is a professional forester who taught and conducted research in forestry at the University of Toronto for 26 years. He has a special interest in forest history and retired from the role of Ontario's Provincial Forester in 1989. He is also the author of Ontario Forests: A Historical Perspective, published in 2001.

What struck me at this year's Lambda Awards was the diversity of the award headings, spanning twenty-six categories from lesbian non-fiction through bisexual poetry, LGBTQ anthology, trans literature to gay mystery, and just about everything in between.

Today, as we know, the Lambda Awards gloriously celebrate the best of LGBTQ writing and "affirm that LGBTQ stories are part of the literature of the world."

It wasn't always like that.

Every author needs them and every author dreads them, but when I saw the review in the April 2016 edition of the Literary Review of Canada, I was delighted.

Sara Mojtehedzadeh is a reporter for the Toronto Star, where she writes about labour issues and precarious work. She entitled her review Hello Girls: A strike by women workers that energized Canada’s labour movement.

Since Cracked: How telephone operators took on Canada’s largest corporation and won! was published at the end of 2015. I have received great feedback.

First off some readers let me know that they felt it was an easy read.  That is important because I wrote it as a history book with 300 footnotes.  Evidence-based history can be daunting for lay readers, so I was immensely pleased that the general reader could find it readable and continue to the end.

Cracked: How the telephone operators took on Canada's largest corporation and won! This is my third book but my first time writing history. I wrote the book as a result of going to a birthday party for one of the principal organizers mentioned in the book.  A number of the people involved in the campaign and strike were there and after food, cake and a few drinks, we reminisced about the events featured in Cracked.

Dundurn Press is pleased to announce that Joan M. Roberts has won the 2016 Alison Prentice Award presented by the Ontario Historical Society for Cracked: How Telephone Operators Took on Canada’s Largest Corporation ... And Won. The award honours the best book on women’s history in Ontario, published in the past three years.

Caroline Di Cocco delivered this introduction at the June 11, 2016 OHS Award Ceremony.

I’m currently sitting at my desk looking over the weathered notebook that was my constant companion throughout the creation of The Ontario Craft Beer Guide. Every pub, every brewery, every beer that I was around, my notebook was always with me. Among the notes and impressions I had on the individual beers, I also included some of the lessons I learned while doing my part in putting this guide together. The biggest one, of course, is how far Ontario has come in beer selection.

It's time for baseball, books, and...BEER! As summer approaches quickly, restaurant patios are opening and you’ll want to know about the best brews to drink. The Ontario Craft Beer Guide authors, Robin LeBlanc and Jordan St. John, had the tough job of sampling some of Ontario's best and worst. Recently, the beer aficionados spoke with Josh Rubin of the Toronto Star about Ontario breweries, the future beer scene, and their favourites. LeBlanc also shares the duo’s best picks for what to drink this summer – hint – they’re a pilsner, pale ale, and wheat beer.

By now, many of you will have seen this article in USA Today, stating that “creepiness” is linked to clowns, men, and birdwatching. I have to say, I agree whole-heartedly. There are few creepier things than stalking through a quiet forest early in the morning only to be confronted by a man in a polka-dotted jumpsuit and a red nose, carrying a pair of high-end Swarovskis.

It’s hard to think that your relationship with your love could be ripped apart by something as simple as money. Sadly, statistics continue to indicate that money matters are the leading cause of separation and divorce in North America.

Not surprisingly money matters comprise eight out of every ten arguments between couples and that’s because everything that you and your honey do with your money is a reflection of deeply rooted values that you both learned growing up.

Hamilton’s heritage homes and museums teem with anecdotes and stories, vividly conveying the early history of a Steel City fast transforming itself into a knowledge and cultural destination. Here are seven pieces of history I learned from Hamilton curators and museum guides.

 

“Over the course of a century… facts, errors, and myths regarding Thomson’s life and death have become jumbled into provocative, entertaining, but ultimately untrustworthy stories.”

                Introduction, The Many Deaths of Tom Thomson

 

The renowned Canadian landscape painter Tom Thomson likely died on July 8, 1917. We don’t know for sure.

Just like we don’t exactly know how he died.

Jeremy, tell us a bit about your book.

Sticky Branding is your branding playbook. It provides ideas, stories, and exercises that will make your company stand out, attract customers, and grow an incredible brand.

I wrote the book for small- and mid-sized companies. It doesn’t take big budgets and endless resources to grow a Sticky Brand. It’s achievable for any business willing to challenge industry norms and find innovative ways to serve its customers.

I recently read an article about branding -- you know, the process of identifying a product, assessing its characteristics and value, and then developing a logo, slogan, and sales plan to get it out there to the public.

We're all familiar with name brands, though perhaps not so aware of the psychological effect clever marketing of said brands can have on us. After all, we've been exposed to advertising for a long time. We're pretty much immune and desensitized.

The Stories of Safe House

Posted on May 4 by Kyle in Non-fiction

Following the creative short stories of last year's Let's Tell This Story Properly, Dundurn is publishing a collection of creative non-fiction short stories with Safe House.

A mix of memoir, life writing, reportage, and essays, from east, west, and southern Africa, this anthology illuminates African narratives to readers both inside and outside the continent.

Here's a look at the stories you'll find.

 

Lessons of a New Canadian Gardener

Posted on May 3 by Kyle

Spring is in the air, which means it’s time to get that garden started. It’s worth noting that I live in an apartment with a deck, so there is no autumn bulb planting. If you have a ground garden, you’re a few months late to the garden party…

I grew up in a home with huge gardens (it is a coincidence that my mother’s last name is Green) but everything I learned about ground gardening does not translate to potted plants and indoor gardens. My potted herbs don’t last long enough to cook with, my flower baskets burn in the summer sun, and my tomatoes stay very tiny, and very green.

Dundurn is pleased to announce that Nipissing: Historic Waterway, Wilderness Playground by Françoise Noël has been nominated for the 2016 Louise de Kiriline Lawrence Award, to be awarded in mid-August, 2016.

Administered by the Ontario Library Service – North, this is an award that recognizes Northern authors.

The world is not at war, but as we scan almost every continent, it is naïve and optimistic to say that we are at peace. Over the last five years, the end of wars in Iraq or Afghanistan has really meant the outbreak of other hostilities across a plethora of countries,  outbreaks in Europe and North America, Indonesia and elsewhere.

If I hadn't...

Posted on April 19 by James Bartleman

Some people take up fishing, golf or travel when they reach their mid-sixties and draw their first pension cheques. I fulfilled a long-standing dream and took up writing books. I am now seventy-six and In Seasons of Hope, I look back over seventy years to my early connections to Muskoka, Orillia and the Chippewas of Rama First Nation. I move on to my thirty-five years as a Canadian diplomat foreign policy adviser to the prime minister. I finish up with my time as Ontario’s first Aboriginal lieutenant governor. People like looking at photos and so the book is filled with them.

A Q&A about Food, Sex, and Stacey Gorlicky

Posted on April 12 by Kyle

Tell us about your book.

Food, Sex and You explores the relationship with food, sex and body image.  I share my personal experience with food addiction and how that damaging relationship affected intimacy in my own relationship in my own life.  The book outlines my road to recovery and I share practical steps and treatments that readers can apply to their own journey.

Dundurn is pleased to announce that Catherine Macdonald’s Put on the Armour of Light has won the Michael Van Rooy Award for Genre Fiction, part of the Manitoba Book Awards. The winner was announced at a reception at the Ambassador Ballroom, Radisson Hotel, at 7pm April 30th in Winnipeg.

I accidentally wrote a book. Not the kind of accident where you break a favourite lead-crystal glass by dropping it on granite tile, or brain a fellow golfer by slicing your tee shot onto an adjoining fairway. More like that accident where you set off looking for a western route to the Indies and discover a whole new continent. Or you design an adhesive to stick porcelain tile to a metallic spaceship and end up with a Post-It note.

 

The Bank of Canada is looking for some of Canada's most bankNOTEable women. We asked the women of Dundurn who they'd choose and why. It wasn't long before everyone had their eyes glued to Merna Forster's 100 Canadian Heroines and 100 More Canadian Heroines.

The ultimate giveaway came when Robert B. Parker began running an author’s photo on his book jackets showing him in poses with his dog. For years, and over the course of a dozen or more novels in Parker’s compelling series featuring the Boston private eye Spenser, I had figured that Parker, in shaping Spenser’s personality and back story, had borrowed elements from his own life and grafted them on to his fictional guy Spenser. Parker had fought in the Korean War; so did Spenser.

A migraine is more than just a headache, it's actually a complex neurological disorder. How scary is it then that migraines are the third most common disease in the world? While there is no one-size-fits all treatment for migraines, here are some doctor-given advice to dealing with your average migraine.

  1. 1) Be proactive, learn about migraines. You are the main manager of your own brain!
  2. View post on imgur.com

Fundamental changes are being triggered in these lands. Curricula are being rewritten across the country by provincial ministries of education to incorporate treaty education and Indigenous perspectives in their education systems. Added to this is the push in education circles to implement "inquiry-based learning," an approach that nurtures students' natural predispositions to issues concerning social justice and human rights.

#InsideDundurn with Kate

Posted on March 18 by Kyle

Meet Kate, she’s the Marketer here at Dundurn. She’s basically the woman who makes sure marketing’s ideas become a reality. “I work with the marketing team to develop marketing plans and make sure they are executed as expected.”

Definitely the person you want on your side when it comes to planning ahead.

She’s also responsible for organizing and preparing for the many events Dundurn attends every year. And, of course, advertising.

If it seems like managing all of these can be a little like trying to wrangle an octopus at times… it is. But that’s the fun part.

When Canada declared war on Germany in September, 1939, women from across the nation went to war on the home front. They stepped up, doffing their aprons and donning factory uniforms to bridge the gap with a sombre commitment to do whatever was required to bring their men home. Battles on the frontlines raged while women in Canada braved hardship, managed food rations, raised their families, and often worked in highly dangerous conditions.

It's a truth universally acknowledged that a reader without a book must be in want of a new book. Except, when you work in publishing, that's rarely the case. We always have a book to read.

I stopped people from around the Dundurn office to ask them what they are currently reading curled up with a cup of tea (or coffee, we're inclusive). Here's what we're reading at Dundurn HQ!

What tops your Great Canadian Bucket List?

Posted on February 29 by Kyle

Want to win The Great Canadian Bucket List AND one of the expansions? Vote for the activity that would be highest on your Great Canadian Bucket List and you're entered for a chance to win 2 bucket list books! Increase your chances by doing additional options like spreading the word or tweeting us!
Contest open March 1, 2016 - March 7, 2016

Stonechild and Rouleau are back for round 3, tell us about Tumbled Graves.

The book opens with the disappearance of a woman and her three year old daughter, an investigation that begins in Kingston, Ontario, but expands to Gananoque, Ottawa and a biker bar in Montreal. In addition, major developments take place in the lives of the main cops: Officer Kala Stonechild becomes guardian for her cousin’s teenage daughter while Staff Sergeant Jacques Rouleau must face the impending death of his ex-wife.

 

I am often asked by beginner gardeners, “What do I need to know to succeed in the garden?” 

It is an excellent question as the “rules” boil down to a few simple but fundamentally critical points that cannot be overlooked if you want to achieve the garden of your dreams, whether it is a food garden or an ornamental garden. 

 

Here are my top 5 tips for gardening success:

  • Improve your soil.

Black history is something that surrounded me every day as a youth. I grew up in North Buxton, a mostly black town in southwestern Ontario that was a popular destination for slaves escaping from the southern U.S. via the Underground Railroad. The original one-room schoolhouse from the Elgin Settlement still stands near the center of town. I can recall one year, during Black History Month, my class at the mostly white school I attended in nearby Merlin had arranged to visit North Buxton on a field trip.

Dundurn is pleased to announce that Local Customs by Audrey Thomas has been nominated for the Ontario Library Association (OLA)’s 2016 Evergreen Award, part of the Forest of Reading program. The Evergreen Award features adult titles, and the list is chosen by a committee of experienced library staff.

When I first had the idea to write Hawk, I knew I would have to go to the Oil Sands and see it with my own eyes. I'd done a lot of online research and had already decided that my protagonist would come from the remote First Nations Community of Fort Chipewyan, down-steam of the oil sands industry where according to Mr. Google there was a lot of sickness, including cancer, thought by some to be related to toxins from the industry.

Ukkusiksalik is the traditional name of a region in the northwestern corner of Hudson Bay. No one lives there today, but for the Inuit it has a special significance because it was a land of plenty for their ancestors, a bountiful hunting ground where one could always find food. In difficult times and in times of hunger, people came from the north and the south and from inland to the west to find sustenance in Ukkusiksalik. As a result, it is a landscape of stories.

Syrian Arab Republic Flag

In the late summer of 2015, a single image served to crystallize emotions and outrage around the world. The image was that of a Syrian toddler’s corpse that had been discovered washed up on a Turkish beach. When this heart-breaking photo appeared on the front pages of the world’s newspapers the hordes of asylum-seekers then pressing for entry into the European Union suddenly had a human face.

I'm not a gamer.

I was raised on an NES with a bootleg cartridge of more than three hundred games - most of which were glitchy beyond recognition, but several of which were actually playable. I spent hours mastering Tetris and my favourite side-scroller, Circus Troupe (which, upon further googling may have actually been called Circus Charlie on copies that weren't super illegal). I dabbled in Mario Brothers, Pac Man and (the unfortunately named) Pooyan.

But I'm not a gamer.