Vote on your favourite book cover!

Vote on your favourite book cover!

Posted on March 5 by admin
Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on Pinterest

This week we celebrate International Women’s Day. In recognition of this event we’ve chosen four books that feature strong, independent women for our book cover contest. The winning title will be given away in Thursday’s Twitter contest. You can find out more about each book below. But first, pick your favourite cover!

_____________________________________________________________

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

Sarah’s Legacy by Valerie Sherrard: Sarah and her mother become the recipients of an unusual inheritance. A home of their own sounds too good to be true but the conditions that come with it are strange indeed.

Solitary Courage by Mona Winberg and J.Patrick Boyer:  Solitary Courage is the story of a mother’s tough-love determination, her severely disabled daughter’s astonishing triumphs, and a documentary record of the political battles, organizational conflicts, and human struggles that citizens with disabilities face and fight every day of their lives.

Mona Winberg became a pioneer of independent living, and emerged a leading advocate for citizens with mental and physical disabilities. Her courageous causes erupted from her deep reservoir of compassion and concern. Her unflinching challenges to the status quo expressed both optimism and realism about life and society. Her life is testament to the power of Solitary Courage.

Between 1986 and 1999 she was the only newspaper columnist in North America regularly writing about disability issues. Through her award-winning column “Disabled Today” in Toronto’s Sunday Sun, Mona Winberg painstakingly built up a body of work of more than 600 articles chronicling front-line battles for equality. She was a realist, a wise person with a no-nonsense approach, kindly, but clear-eyed.

Solitary Courage begins with the story of Mona Winberg’s life, followed by a representative selection of 156 of her columns organized into 20 thematic chapters, the best of Mona in her own words. The last part of the book reflects upon Mona Winberg’s legacy of lessons that still connect to programs and policies touching the lives of Canadians with disabilities today.

The subjects are wide-ranging and engaging because Mona used personal examples of individuals with disabilities and news-making issues raised by their plight. She also reported on the street-level outcomes of government policies. This variety and approach to disability issues provides real education and genuine human interest, whatever a reader’s background or experience.

Empty Cradle by Diana Walsh: This story is based on a true crime – dates, times, and details were researched from media sources, court documents, and police records. Empty Cradle is the writer’s personal recollection of the days leading up to and surrounding the abduction of her newborn infant, just days before Christmas.

Clinic of Hope by Donna M. Ivey: This story of Rene M. Caisse describes her pursuit to obtain official recognition of her herbal cancer remedy, Essiac, her name spelled backwards. Caisse was thrust into a life-long medical-legal-political controversy that still persists since her death in 1978. This research presents a biography of a remarkable woman’s struggle to help humanity.