ASA CRAWFORD DISAPPEARS.

ASA CRAWFORD DISAPPEARS.

Posted on September 20 by Sharon Robart-Johnson
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On Saturday evening, November 12, 1912, Asa Crawford left his house and was never seen again.  On Sunday afternoon, his son, Lemuel, found his hat on Water Street, near the Burrell-Johnson Iron Foundry. An extensive, but unsuccessful, search was made.  Asa Crawford had disappeared.

Several theories surfaced as to what might have happened to Asa.  It was strongly believed that Asa had been fatally beaten by several of the French crewman from a coal ship that had delivered their cargo to the Burrell-Johnson Iron Foundry, and that to hide the deed, his lifeless body was unceremoniously thrown into the ship’s coal bin and covered.  The story goes, that once the ship had left port and was sailing out to sea, his body was dismembered and either disposed of in the boiler, or thrown overboard.

Local residents felt that Asa was murdered by Yarmouth men and then buried in a shallow grave.  In either case, it was believed that Asa’s brown skin played a major roll in his demise. Approximately two weeks later on Wednesday, November 27, a badly decomposed body of a man was found in the water at Hilton’s Point, Chebogue.  It was thought by some to be Asa, but the corpse could not be identified because of its advanced state of decomposition.  It is doubtful that this person was Asa, simply because the body’s clothing carried the label, A. Shuman & Co., one of the largest clothing establishments in Boston.  Asa was a poor man barely able to feed his family.  As of this year (2012), Asa has been missing for 100 years with still no clue as to what happened to him.

Sharon Robart-Johnson

Posted by Dundurn Guest on December 6, 2014

Sharon Robart-Johnson

Sharon Robart-Johnson has a rich cultural background comprised of both African and European ancestry. Born in the South End of Yarmouth, she is a 13th generation Nova Scotian and part of her heritage dates back to the early slaves who were brought to the Digby County area in the late 1700s and to the Black Loyalists who arrived in Shelburne in 1783.