Mystery

Category: Mystery

New People and Places

Posted on September 6 by Barbara Fradkin in Mystery

But fifteen years is a long time for a writer to spend with the same characters in the same place. I wanted to travel. I wanted to meet new people. So I put him, his long-suffering wife, and his loyal colleagues on the shelf, left the complex, subtly hued city of Ottawa, and set off into the wilderness, both literally and figuratively.

By now, many of you will have seen this article in USA Today, stating that “creepiness” is linked to clowns, men, and birdwatching. I have to say, I agree whole-heartedly. There are few creepier things than stalking through a quiet forest early in the morning only to be confronted by a man in a polka-dotted jumpsuit and a red nose, carrying a pair of high-end Swarovskis.

The ultimate giveaway came when Robert B. Parker began running an author’s photo on his book jackets showing him in poses with his dog. For years, and over the course of a dozen or more novels in Parker’s compelling series featuring the Boston private eye Spenser, I had figured that Parker, in shaping Spenser’s personality and back story, had borrowed elements from his own life and grafted them on to his fictional guy Spenser. Parker had fought in the Korean War; so did Spenser.

Tell us about your book.

Put on the Armour of Light is an old-fashioned mystery in the amateur sleuth tradition, with touches of humour and romance. It’s set in Winnipeg in 1899 and the hero is a young Presbyterian minister, Charles Lauchlan. I’m more attracted to mystery books where character and setting are to the fore, and where the detective uses his or her grey matter to solve the crime rather than whizz-bang forensic technology. So that’s the kind of book I tried to write.

 

How did you come up with the title?

Barbara Fradkin

Literary Clarity with Barbara Fradkin

Posted on January 27 by Kyle in Interview, Mystery

Tell us about your book.

NONE SO BLIND examines justice itself, not in the abstract, but with all the flaws, biases, doubts, and best efforts of those who strive to carry it out. When a convicted college professor is found dead weeks after being released on parole, Ottawa Police Inspector Michael Green is forced to re-examine the case upon which his career and reputation were built.

 

How did you come up with the idea for this work?

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