December 2020

One of the things I used to comfort myself with when COVID-19 first appeared on the scene, waaaay back at the beginning of 2020 (are we done yet?), was that at least this wasn’t Ancient Egyptian times! That may sound odd, but I was in the midst of editing the second book in my series, The Desert Prince, which picks up with healer Sesha and her friends, where The Lost Scroll of the Physician leaves off.

Most people will remember 2020 as the year of COVID-19; a year that was downright awful. And for good reason, of course — the pandemic wreaked havoc on the world, ruining lives, shuttering businesses, and crippling the economy. A year ago, nobody could have predicted we’d all be donning face masks or lining up for groceries; that stadiums and playgrounds would be closed, office towers vacated. Travelling abroad? Forget about it. The risks of catching and spreading COVID were not worth the reduced price of airfare. In fact, the only place that felt safe was in the closed comfort of home.

Dundurn Press is thrilled to congratulate author Kate Armstrong whose 2019 book The Stone Frigate is the winner of the 2020 Ontario Historical Society Alison Prentice Award!


The Stone Frigate:The Royal Military College's First Female Cadet Speaks Out is the harrowing account of an ordinary, young woman admitted as the first female Cadet at the Royal Military College of Canada, as she struggled for survival in the ultimate boys’ club. The Stone Frigate was also a finalist for the 2020 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize in Nonfiction. 

Sometimes, when life and art overlap it’s a happy synchronicity. Other times not so happy when a friend experiences an over-long recovery from COVID and her doctor has nothing to suggest. She typed, “We can’t garden without needing naps; we can’t take walks; even grocery shopping leaves us all exhausted for days. You know about managing fatigue from your character Jan in those Falls books. Can you suggest anything we can try?”